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Russia Loses the War of the Churches (43)


Anonymous expert compilation, analysis, and reporting.

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The Russian “religious war” false flag urban terrorism campaign may be gathering momentum – clerics inside the Muscovian church discretely brief media on intended operations, suggesting also that the Muscovian proxy church in Ukraine is rapidly losing cohesion. The operation, as described, is classic Soviet revolutionary warfare doctrine, i.e. making use of the “lumpenproletariat”, Soviet jargon for organized crime. The latter has been a recurring feature of reported assassinations.

Russian media reporting that Patriarch Kirill is falling out of favor, while the use of proxies in concert with Russian propaganda assets to spread divisions in global Orthodoxy continues.


Seizing 10 churches: ”Russian world” plotting massive provocation in Kyiv | UNIAN

Large-scale provocations are being plotted in the Orthodox churches of the Moscow Patriarchate in Kyiv, a number of priests claimed. Moscow has long been trying to hinder the process of Ukraine Church getting from Constantinople a tomos on autocephaly, that is, canonical independence from Moscow. Large-scale provocations are being plotted in the Orthodox churches of the Moscow Patriarchate in Kyiv, a number of priests claimed. Patriots from among the priests of the Moscow Patriarchate told the Obozrevatel outlet that they had received anonymous calls with alerts about the “imminent attacks” of “nationalist thugs.” Allegedly it is about the seizure of 10 churches across the capital. However, according to Obozrevatel’s own sources, it is pro-Russian forces that under the guise of “nationalists” are planning the attacks. The group is led by a former deputy of the Kyiv regional council (member of a pro-Yanukovych party) Yuriy Tsykalenko, more commonly known in criminal circles as “Yura Kachok.” On condition of anonymity, the priests told Obozrevatel that he is responsible for the physical protection of Kyiv-Pechersk and Pochayiv Lavras. According to media reports, in the days of the Euromaidan protests, Tsykalenko led groups of the so-called “titushki” (hired thugs) who committed attacks on activists. It is known that Yuriy Tsykalenko in 2014 resigned as a deputy of the Party of Regions and left for Moscow. However, after the criminal cases against him were suddenly closed, he returned to Kyiv. Prosecutor General of Ukraine Yuriy Lutsenko stated earlier that in Tsykalenko’s CV there is a whole chain of acts falling under various articles of the Criminal Code. “It seems that this is one of the brightest representatives of the ‘Sicilian mafia’,” Lutsenko noted. As reported earlier, the UOC of the Kyiv Patriarchate warned about provocations in connection with the imminent receipt of the tomos of autocephaly by a Church of Ukraine. On Saturday, November 17, in Kryvyi Rih, a group of unidentified perpetrators organized provocations outside the residence of Metropolitan Yefrem of Kryvyi Rih and Nikopol (UOC MP), trying to break and enter into his house.

Window on Eurasia — New Series: Putin’s Tilt Away from Kirill Continues: Patriarch Gets Phone Call, Not Visit on His Birthday

Paul Goble Staunton, November 21 – Vladimir Putin’s anger at Patriarch Kirill, underscored this week by his visit to Metropolitan Tikhon in Pskov (windowoneurasia2.blogspot.com/2018/11/putin-makes-clear-metropolitan-tikhon.html), continued today when the Kremlin leader telephoned rather than visited the church leader on his birthday (credo.press/220988/). In past years, Putin has visited Kirill, a sign of special recognition and support. Consequently, his decision not to visit him this year will be viewed by many in the Russian Orthodox Church and Russia more generally as an indication that Kirill, after the autocephaly crisis in Ukraine, is very much out of favor. That will weaken the churchman’s position, but Leonid Radzikhovsky argues that while Kirill is weakened by all this, the possibility that he would leave office as Pope Benedict XVI did in the Roman Catholic Church is “zero.” There simply is no way to force Kirill to leave (publizist.ru/blogs/112022/28060/-). Forcing out Kirill would not be to Putin’s advantage, the Russian commentator says. On the one hand, it would be such a crude power play that it would cost the Kremlin leader far more than he would gain, especially given that there would always be the chance that a Patriarch Tikhon would take his new position more seriously than friendship, just as Thomas Beckett did. Moreover, on the other hand, such an action would weaken the ROC MP at a time when it is already reeling from the developments in Ukraine and world Orthodoxy and the prospects that the retreat of the Russian church will spread into other countries as well. That wouldn’t serve Putin’s interest either. Kirill has clearly suffered a defeat over Ukraine and lost some of the support he had with Putin. But even that may not be enough to cause Putin to move, Radzikhovsky says. After all, the Kremlin leader has protected the disastrous Dmitry Rogozin despite one failure after another from dismissal and possible criminal charges. Further, in Kirill’s case as in Rogozin’s, “there is no connection between the results of action and the rewards [Putin will hand out] for it.”

Tomos for Ukraine church: Poroshenko’s adviser to attend Synod of Ecumenical Patriarchate | UNIAN

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has said his adviser, Director of the National Institute for Strategic Studies Rostyslav Pavlenko will attend the Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate on November 27-29, which is expected to approve a tomos of autocephaly for the Ukrainian church. The local council of a new, united Orthodox church in Ukraine will be held in December. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has said his adviser, Director of the National Institute for Strategic Studies Rostyslav Pavlenko will attend the Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate on November 27-29, which is expected to approve a tomos of autocephaly for the Ukrainian church. “On November 27-29, Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration Rostyslav Pavlenko is going to Istanbul/Constantinople to attend the historic Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, where a decision on the approval of a tomos will be made,” Poroshenko said at a meeting with students of the Kyiv National University of Trade and Economics, an UNIAN correspondent reported. “And in December, we’ll hold a [holy] council of the new church,” he added.

Constantinople moving forward to recognize independent Ukrainian Orthodox Church : News Headlines | Catholic Culture

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Οἰκουμενικόν Πατριαρχεῖον

In preparation of the meeting of the Holy and Sacred Synod on 27-29 November, 2018, the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople reiterates its sacred decision to grant the Tomos of Autocephaly to the Orthodox Church of Ukraine. While the preparation process for the Holy Council (SOBOR) of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine is underway, the concrete date within December 2018, will be presented for the confirmation and announcement by the Holy and Sacred Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. 19 XI 2018 Phanar Chief Secretariat of the Holy and Sacred Synod

Ecumenical Patriarch Confirms Tomos for Ukrainian Orthodox Church

The Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople has reaffirmed its decision to grant the Ukrainian Orthodox Church a Tomos of Autocephaly, according to a statement from the Chief Secretariat of the Holy and Sacred Synod. The Holy and Sacred Synod will meet on November 27-29, where they will approve the text of the Tomos that will allow for the creation of a single independent Ukrainian Orthodox Church. The statement adds that a concrete date for the announcement of Tomos will be set “within December.” Meanwhile, the united bishop’s council of Ukraine will also convene in Kyiv in early December in order to elect a head of the forthcoming Ukrainian Orthodox Church, parliament speaker Andriy Parubiy stated during a meeting of the Conciliation Council. The Tomos of Autocephaly will be handed to whoever is chosen.

Ukraine’s Orthodox churches to officially unify in December | KyivPost

After months of negotiations, Ukraine’s Orthodox churches are about to unify officially and form a Ukrainian church independent of Russia, cutting religious ties dating from the 17th century. The highest body in world Orthodoxy, the Istanbul-based Ecumenical Patriarchate of the Eastern Orthodox Church, announced on Nov. 19 that the Unification Council of the Orthodox churches of Ukraine would take place in December. The exact date is yet to be announced. At the council, the representatives of Ukraine’s Orthodox churches will choose the patriarch of Kyiv. The newly-elected patriarch will receive from the Istanbul-based Orthodox authorities an official decree, called a “tomos,” granting the new church an autocephaly, or independence. This will end the 359-year period of the Ukrainian church being subordinated to the Russian church, and instead move it into direct subordination of the central Orthodox authorities in Istanbul. The Ecumenical Patriarchate also reiterated its decision to grant the autocephaly to the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, as they prepare to hold council on Nov. 27-29. Ukraine’s Orthodox church has been subordinated to Russia for centuries, while the Russian church in turn was subordinated to the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople (the former name of Istanbul). However, due to its size, the Moscow-based Russian Orthodox Church has wielded great influence in world Orthodoxy. Ever since the Soviet Union broke up and Ukraine gained independence from Russia in 1991, many in Ukraine called for a break in church ties as well. Several top clergymen from the Moscow-subordinated Ukrainian church formed a breakaway independent church in the late 1990s. The independent church grew much stronger after Russia started the war against Ukraine in 2014, invading Crimea and Donbas, but only now has official recognition in the world community of Orthodox churches been granted. The former breakaway church based in Kyiv will form the basis of the new unified independent church. However, the leaders of the Moscow-subordinated Ukrainian church oppose unification and say they will not join the new independent church, and will cut all ties with the Ecumenical Patriarchate in Istanbul. The Moscow-subordinated church controls more than half of the existing churches in Ukraine. The Ecumenical Patriarchate announced in October it would grant independence from Russia to the Ukrainian church, and withdrew its excommunication of the head of the breakaway Ukrainian church, Patriarch Filaret.

Andrii Krawchuk | Orthodox independence in Ukraine: What’s Next?

The Ukraine Orthodox Church has a historic opportunity to gain independence from Moscow, whether it can grasp this opportunity is anyone’s guess.

Ukrainian schismatics are ‘idolaters’ with blood on their hands, US rebel Orthodox priest tells RT — RT World News

American Orthodox priest Mark Tyson has told RT he quit the Patriarchate of Constantinople because he couldn’t share a church with Ukrainian schismatics, who have blood on their hands and are driven by nationalism and not Christ. American Orthodox priest Mark Tyson has told RT he quit the Patriarchate of Constantinople because he couldn’t share a church with Ukrainian schismatics, who have blood on their hands and are driven by nationalism and not Christ. On October 11, the Constantinople Patriarchate, seen as the center of the Orthodox faith, agreed to recognize the Ukrainian Orthodox Church as independent from the Moscow Patriarchate. The church had been led by previously anathematized Patriarch Filaret. On the day of the schism, Father Mark resigned from his parish in the town of Bluefield in West Virginia and joined the Russian Orthodox Church. It was a tough but a well-informed decision for Tyson, who has been learning Russian since he was 18, and had been closely following news from Ukraine in recent months.

Bishop murder saga unsettles Egypt’s Coptic Orthodox Church – Politics – Egypt – Ahram Online

Bishop murder saga unsettles Egypt’s Coptic Orthodox Church

Greece′s Orthodox Church and state consider divorce | Europe| News and current affairs from around the continent | DW | 22.11.2018

The Greek government wants to sack the nation’s clergy in a bid to break away from the church. But severing those ties in Europe’s most religious country could spell a “holy war.” Anthee Carassava reports from Athens.

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