Information operations · Information Warfare · Russia · Ukraine

Russia Loses the War of the Churches (14)


Anonymous expert compilation, analysis, and reporting.

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The announcement by the Universal Patriarch in Constantinople that undoes 332 years of unlawful control of the Ukrainian church by Russia has produced an immense volume of media coverage, for a topic of this kind. The Russian reaction, comprising threats, denials, falsehoods, blameshifting and other typical artefacts of Russian public communication accounts for as much media activity as reports covering the substance of the matter.

The Russian foreign ministry has fallen back on the usual catch-all explanation for all of Russia’s self-inflicted woes, describing the decision as a  “US-Backed ‘Provocation’”. As if the US had any control over the Eastern Orthodox Church hierarchy, but never let facts get in the way of “Russian Truth”!

Much more interesting are the threats being made by the Kremlin: “protect the interests of the Orthodox in Ukraine,” qualifying it with “exclusively through political and diplomatic means.” The latter of course echoes earlier covert interventions overseas, especially in Ukraine. Notably Russia’s initial excuse for invading Ukraine was to “protect Russian speakers”, upon which Russian speakers joined militias to fight Russia, and increasingly, shifted to speaking Ukrainian. Then it became: “protect ethnic Russians”, upon which polling revealed the percentage of self-identified ethnic Russians rapidly collapsing from 17 percent to small single digits. RFE/RL’s Miller interviewed a good number of clerics and parishioners in both churches, and the most likely outcome will be a replay of the previous two instances – mass defections of clerics and parishioners to the new Ukrainian church. As the Russians intend to self-anathemize and sever ties with the rest of Orthodoxy, those who remain in the Russian church will become schismatics, not in communion with the rest of global orthodoxy, and for truly serious believers, this will not be acceptable, giving even stronger incentives to depart.

Muscovy has raised the matter of “radical groups” that might seize churches claimed by the Russian church. In Russia, radical Orthodox groups have been a persistent problem, harassing secular groups, attacking believers of other denominations and religions – there is a real likelihood that Russia will organise false flag attacks inside Ukraine, and a reasonable bet is that the shock troops will be recruited from these radical Russian Orthodox groups (sometimes dubbed the “Orthodox Taliban”).

Prof Goble reports on Russia’s harassment of the Ukrainian church in Crimea, local clerics predict the Russians will escalate this effort further.

The crash of the Soyuz just after it was blessed by the Russian Orthodox cleric has produced a very vigorous reaction on Twitter, the BBC survey is well worth a read (COCW). Also some background on Russia’s “Orthodox Vatican” project.

Very good analysis of the global impact of the synod decision by Prof Goble, also Balkan Insight articles suggest there will be upheavals in the Balkans, as the Montenegran and Macedonian churches seek to separate from the Serbian church. Coalson’s analysis is also good.

It is worth observing that the game Russia is playing bears some resemblance to that played by Iran – trying to usurp the authority of key Shia institutions based in Iraq, the hub of Shia religious life, and exploiting gullible Shia in Iraq, Syria and Lebanon to promote their own expansionist and ideological agendas. Like Iran, Russia sees the church as another arm of state power to be used to impose their will upon others, domestically and overseas.


Russian FM says independent Ukrainian Church is US-backed ‘provocation’

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Friday said the Istanbul-based Ecumenical Patriarchate’s decision to recognise the independence of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church was a “provocation” backed by Washington. “Interfering in Church life is forbidden by law in Ukraine, in Russia

Moscow Calls Independent Ukrainian Church US-Backed ‘Provocation’

Experts say Russian aggression since 2014 has accelerated the Kyiv Patriarchate’s long-standing efforts to seek independence from Moscow

Kremlin promises to defend Russian Orthodox Christians in Ukraine — RT Russian Politics News

Russia will protect Orthodox believers in Ukraine if religious disputes go beyond lawful confrontation, Vladimir Putin’s press secretary Dmitry Peskov has said, adding that Moscow would only use political and diplomatic methods.

Putin Vows to Defend Believers in Ukraine Church Dispute

 

“Russia to protect interests of Orthodox faithful,” – Kremlin vows to intervene in Ukraine’s local church creation | Censor.NET

12.10.18 17:48 – “Russia to protect interests of Orthodox faithful,” – Kremlin vows to intervene in Ukraine’s local church creation The Russian Federation will certainly protect the interests of the Orthodox faithful in the same manner as Russia protects the interests of Russians and Russian speakers globally. View news.

Moscow vows to protect Orthodox believers in Ukraine | UNIAN

The Kremlin vowed to protect the interests of the Orthodox believers in Ukraine “politically and diplomatically,” claiming Moscow does not intend to interfere in the “interchurch dialogue,” that’s according to a Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov who commented on the latest decision of the Ecumencial Patriarchate of Constantinople to proceed to granting autocephaly to the Orthodox Church of Ukraine. According to Putin’s spox, “everything that happens in the Orthodox world is a subject of increased attention on the part of the state.”

Russia vows to defend believers in Ukraine church dispute | Reuters

Russia vowed on Friday to defend Russian church believers in Ukraine from any illegal activity against them following Kiev’s moves toward a historic split from the Russian Orthodox Church.

Fears of ‘religious war’ over Ukrainian Church independence

Moscow has promised to defend Orthodox believers in Ukraine while Kiev accuses its neighbour of preparing for “religious war” after the Istanbul-based Ecumenical Patriarchate’s decision to recognise the independence of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. The Patriarchate’s announcement

Russia vows tough response to Ecumenical Patriachate over Ukraine | Reuters

The Russian Orthodox Church said on Saturday it would respond firmly to the Istanbul-based Ecumenical Patriarchate over its decision to back Ukraine’s request to establish an independent, or “autocephalous”, Church.

Schism of Orthodoxy in Ukraine deepens as Constantinople greenlights independent church — RT World News

The Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople has decided to begin the creation of an autocephalous Orthodox Church in Ukraine. The move comes despite warnings against it from the Russian Orthodox Church.

Constantinople Lifting Anathema From Filaret Violates Canons – Metropolitan – Sputnik International

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) – The Ecumenical Patriarchate in Constantinople’s decision to lift the anathema from the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Kiev Patriarchate (UOC-KP) head Filaret Denisenko violates several canonical rules of Orthodoxy, former First Hierarch of the Orthodox Church in America metropolitan Jonah (Paffhausen) told Sputnik.

Ukrainian Orthodox Church Refuses to Partake in Unifying Council – Sputnik International

KIEV (Sputnik) – The Ukrainian Orthodox Church (UOC) is not going to take part in the unification council, initiated by the non-canonical church in Ukraine after the Constantinople Patriarchate began the process to grant autocephaly to Ukraine, chairman of the UOC’s Synodal Information Department Archbishop Clement told Sputnik on Friday.

Amid Church Rift, Kremlin Vows To ‘Protect Interests’ Of Faithful In Ukraine

The Kremlin has issued a fresh warning following a key step in Kyiv’s quest for an independent church that is recognized by the Orthodox Christian leadership, saying Russia will protect the interes…

Russia vows to defend believers in Ukraine church dispute | Reuters

Russia vowed on Friday to defend Russian church believers in Ukraine from any illegal activity against them following Kiev’s moves toward a historic split from the Russian Orthodox Church.

Moscow rages as an independent Ukrainian church becomes more likely – The Orthodox Church

A RELIGIOUS rift widened this week, as Orthodox Christianity’s highest spiritual authority, based in Istanbul, firmly asserted its jurisdiction—and rejected Russia’s—over Ukrainian church affairs.

Russian Church Official Says ‘Impossible’ To Remain United With Ecumenical Patriarchate

The head of external relations of the Russian Orthodox Church says a decision about the Ukrainian Orthodox Church made by the synod of the Constantinople Patriarchate has forced the Moscow Patriarchate to end its unity with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople, the Istanbul-based spiritual leader of the world’s Orthodox Christians. Metropolitan Ilarion made the remarks in a program aired by the Rossia-24 television channel on October 13. The broadcast came two days after Ukraine won approval from the synod, led by Bartholomew, to establish an autocephalous — or independent — church. Ilarion said Bartholomew had “recognized the leaders of the schism” within the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, “thus legitimatizing the schism that has existed for more than a quarter of a century.” That, Ilarion said, “has made it impossible for us to stay united with the Constantinople Patriarchate.”

Russia warns of schism in Orthodox Christianity after Ukrainian church granted independence

The Russian church has warned that a decision to recognise Ukrainian denominations that broke away from its control could provoke a schism within Orthodox Christianity.

Christianity faces biggest schism in a millennium | The Week UK

Ukraine granted own independent Orthodox Church despite threats from Moscow

Russian Orthodox Church to break ties with Constantinople: Interfax | Reuters

The Russian Orthodox Church will have to break eucharistical relations with Constantinople over a split with Ukraine’s Orthodox Church, Alexander Volkov, spokesman for Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill, was quoted as saying by Interfax on Thursday.

Ukraine’s split from Russian Orthodox Church puts a dent in Putin’s image – The Globe and Mail

Patriarch Bartholomew’s declaration of independence undermines Putin’s image as the leader of the world’s 300 million Orthodox Christians

Autocephalous Orthodox Church will be in Ukraine – Poroshenko

President Petro Poroshenko has said that the Holy Synod approved a decision to grant the tomos of Autocephaly to the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church.

Ukraine Crisis Media Center: When even atheists pray: Ukraine one step away from the autocephalous church  – To Inform is to Influence

When even atheists pray: Ukraine one step away from the autocephalous church  The church standoff between Kyiv and Moscow has lasted for centuries, but reached its maximum tension over the last six months. On April 19, 2018 the Verkhovna Rada (the Parliament) of Ukraine supported the President’s appeal to establish the Ukrainian single, autocephalous, autonomous church.…

38 of the 46 Ukrainian Orthodox churches in Crimea forced to close by Russian occupiers – Euromaidan Press |

Archbishop Klyment of Simferopol and Crimea says that once autocephaly is granted to Ukraine, the Russian occupation forces on the Ukrainian peninsula are likely to dramatically increase the pressure they have used against his bishopric and the few remaining priests who continue to serve believers there. The churchman spoke at a roundtable in the Ukrainian Crisis Media Center this week (see uacrisis.org in Ukrainian; for a discussion of his remarks and the implications for the Ukrainian church in Crimea in the coming weeks and months, see Yevhen Solonyna’s article at krymr.com). The situation of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate (UOC KP) in occupied Crimea is complicated already, Klyment says. On the one hand, the occupiers have stopped seeking to close his bishopric as such, although they continue to demand that it recognize that Crimea is Russian not Ukrainian. But on the other, they actively work against priests and congregations, harassing the former and trying to recruit them to the Russian security services and Russian church and restricting the ability of the latter to attend services by blocking access or threatening those who remain true to their faith.

Window on Eurasia — New Series: After Autocephaly, Russian Occupiers in Crimea Likely to Intensify Pressure on Ukrainian Church There, Its Archbishop Says

Paul Goble Staunton, October 10 – Archbishop Kliment of Simferopol and Crimea says that once autocephaly is granted to Ukraine, the Russian occupation forces on the Ukrainian peninsula are likely to dramatically increase the pressure they have used against his bishopric and the few remaining priests who continue to serve believers there. The churchman spoke at a roundtable in the Ukrainian Crisis Media Center this week (uacrisis.org/ua/68988-upc-kp-krym in Ukrainian; for a discussion of his remarks and the implications for the Ukrainian church in Crimea in the coming weeks and months, see Yevgeny Solonina’s article at ru.krymr.com/a/neanneksirovannaya-tserkov-v-krymu/29535969.html). The situation of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate in occupied Crimea is complicated already, Kliment says. On the one hand, the occupiers have stopped seeking to close his bishopric as such although they continue to demand that it recognize that Crimea is Russian not Ukrainian. But on the other, they actively work against priests and congregations, harassing the former and trying to recruit them to the Russian security services and Russian church and restricting the ability of the latter to attend services by blocking access or threatening those who remain true to their faith. Now that the Ukrainian church is on the bring of receiving autocephaly, however, the archbishop says, Russian lawyers and officials with whom he has spoken suggest that “pressure by the Russian authorities on the UOC KP in annexed Crimea is likely to intensify, with the actions of the local officials becoming ever “harsher.” Just how dire the situation already is was underscored by another participant at the media center event. Aleksandr Sagan, a Ukrainian specialist on religious affairs, noted that 38 of the 46 UOC KP churches have been closed since 2014, 20 of 25 priests have either fled or ended their activity since the occupation, and services are held in only nine places. Obviously, the situation, one in which UOC KP clergy can continue to function legally only if they acknowledge Russian sovereignty, can get worse. Indeed, Archbishop Kliment told the group that it would have already had it not been for the support his church has received from abroad. The work of human rights groups and the declarations of various governments, both of which have denounced the Russian actions against his faithful, the churchman said, have kept Moscow from being even more repressive in the past by raising the costs to the Russian side from such actions. Archbishop Kliment said he hoped that these same sources would continue to support his church when as seems likely the situation deteriorates further in the coming days.

Patriarch’s Ukraine Bombshell Will Echo in the Balkans :: Balkan Insight

The decision of global Orthodoxy&rsquo;s nominal leader to grant the Ukrainian Orthodox Church independence from Moscow will pit Orthodox churches against each other in the Balkans.

Ukraine Church Independence Leaves Balkan Churches Lost for Words :: Balkan Insight

After the leader of the global Orthodoxy, the Patriarch of Constantinople, announced he will grant the Ukrainian Church independence from Moscow, churches in the Balkans have remained silent for now.

Russians joke Soyuz rocket ‘still heavier than air’ – BBC News

Many commentators have poked fun at a traditional blessing ritual performed by an Orthodox priest who sprinkled holy water on the rocket before the launch. A prominent blogger Ilya Varlamov commented that “the rocket had been blessed before launch, but it was still heavier than the air”. However, some people have playfully blamed the priest himself with @atticus_flinch suggesting “the Soyuz crash was caused by poor quality holy water”. Meanwhile, comedy account Gniloy West wondered whether the priest would be punished for negligence when blessing the rocket. Some have sarcastically linked the failed launch with the news Ukraine has made progress in trying to make its Orthodox Church independent of Moscow. And Sasha Severny tweeted that the emergency landing represented “the worst day for the Russian Orthodox Church in the past 300 years!”

RUSSIA A fortress-like Vatican for the Russian Orthodox Church

The Patriarchate led by Kirill has begun to redevelop the centre of Sergiyev Posad, a city that is home to Russia’s most important monastery. The goal of the project is to build an

Sergiyev Posad – Wikipedia

 

A glimpse at Sergiyev Posad, the heart of Russian Orthodoxy – YouTube

Russia Insight Published on Aug 18, 2015

What Is “the Golden Ring of Russia”? Moscow – Sergiev Posad. How to Get Without a Guide – YouTube

Different Russia Published on Oct 16, 2016 Golden Ring is a set of ancient Russian cities north-east of Moscow which form a circle if you look at them on the map. In this video I would like to tell you about the golden Ring of Russia. I think that many of you have heard this name, but not many people know what it means. And some practical info for tourists:) To get to Sergiev Posad by train: Trains start almost every 30 minutes from Moscow’s Yaroslavskiy Rail Terminal (Ярославский вокзал) to Sergiev Posad. Yaroslavskiy Rail Terminal is near metro station “Komsomolskaya” (Комсомольская) (red line).

Paul Goble: Constantinople Decision on Ukrainian Church Truly has Global Consequences

Paul Goble

 

Staunton, October 12 – Although the Universal Patriarch in Constantinople has not yet given the tomos of autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Bartholemew’s decision to reclaim Ukraine as dominion, thus depriving the Moscow Patriarchate of its claims in Ukraine, and his acceptance of Ukrainian church leaders as his priests, clearly points in that direction.

As many commentators are already pointing out, the consequences of this shift are truly “global” for Ukraine, for the Russian Federation and the Moscow Patriarchate, for the Orthodox world, and for ecumenism and international relations more generally, even though it is certain that Moscow will still try to block or at least slow the process.

The Russian authorities religious and civil have the means to cause enormous trouble in this transition. They can provoke actions against their own churches in Ukraine and blame them on the Ukrainians, costing the latter support around the world.  They can invoke such conflicts to expand military action in Ukraine.

They can continue to mobilize those smaller Orthodox patriarchates they have been able to influence or buy off to speak against the granting of the tomos of autocephaly. And they can seek to interfere in the Orthodox conclave in Ukraine that Constantinople says is necessary as a step toward autocephaly for the Ukrainian church.

The last is the most likely, and the Moscow Patriarchate is certain to signal its intention of trying to block this move from the inside as it were when Patriarch Kirill hosts a meeting of the Holy Synod in Minsk on Monday.  But it is almost certain that Moscow can only delay and not derail the train of autocephaly and thus Ukraine’s separation from Russia after 300 years.

The consequences of such an enormous tectonic shift are so enormous that it is as yet difficult to say what they will all be and how they will play out in the coming days, months, years, and decades. But below are some of the most obvious and important for each of places in which they will be playing out.

For Ukraine, this decision gives new content to its national independence, separating it from Russia in a fundamental way, and giving it the largest Orthodox church in the world, thus making Kyiv a player in international religious life far larger than it has ever been in the past.  More than any decision on language or the Russian invasion, this makes Ukraine truly Ukrainian.

For Russia, it is an enormous loss not only to the pretensions of some broader “Russian world” or to the leadership of the Orthodox world – it is likely to lead to more autocephalies in the former Soviet space and will certainly reduce Moscow’s influence in all of them – but undermines whatever chance for the modernization of Russian Orthodoxy there may have been.

Patriarch Kirill will certainly see his influence at home decline and may even lose his job to Putin’s reputed favorite, Metropolitan Tikhon (Shevkunov) of Pskov, who favors a far more isolationist and anti-Catholic policy than Kirill. There may even be pressure to move the Moscow Patriarchate in the direction of the Old Believers vis-à-vis the West.

There is another reason to believe that Kirill is in trouble: Since becoming patriarch, he has created dozens of bishoprics in Ukraine in order to install his supporters there and ensure that he controls the direction of the church and the election of the next patriarch. With their loss, he will control far less – and others like Tikhon will exploit that fact.

The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate will no longer be the largest Orthodox denomination, although it will still at least for a time be the wealthiest and the most heavily supported by the government. It may try to transform itself into what some call “an Orthodox Vatican,” but it almost certainly will fail.

For Orthodoxy, this will provoke a reordering and a split; but despite heavy breathing in Moscow about this, such splits in the Orthodox world are nothing new. There is no Orthodox pope, and even the Universal Patriarch is at most “first among equals.”  And despite its hopes, Moscow is not going to displace Constantinople in that regard whatever it does.

The number of autocephalous churches will rise, and that will make the Orthodox world more, not less complicated. The level of cooperation among some of its churches will likely fall, especially as the Russian church loses some of its income because of the loss of parishes and bishoprics in Ukraine.

For ecumenism, the grant of autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodoxy will simultaneously both reduce and expand the possibilities for improving relations among the various Christian churches of the World. It will reduce them in the short term because Moscow will become even less a participant than it has been.

But it will expand them at least potentially because Ukraine includes within it both Orthodox and Uniate believers, and the allegiance of the latter to Rome will open new possibilities for conversations, although it is certain that Moscow’s agents will try to play the Uniates and Ukrainian Orthodox off against each other to slow that process.

And for international relations, this development will also have mixed consequences: a wounded Russia perhaps even more ready to strike out against others than it has been, a newly confident Ukraine whose people can claim real progress in nation building separate from the Russian world, and multiple players around the world who will be watching to see how this affects them.

At the very least, it is a great day for Ukraine, a huge loss for Russia, and an occasion for all who reject imperialism of any kind to celebrate.

Robert Coalson | What Comes Next As Ukrainian Orthodox Church Pushes For Independence From Moscow?

On October 11, the Ukrainian Orthodox Church moved one big step closer toward independence from the Moscow Patriarchate. But the road ahead might be even more daunting.

Ukraine’s Patriarch Filaret urges church heads to prepare for election of head of new independent church | UNIAN

Head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate (UOC-KP) Filaret has urged the hierarchs of the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church (UAOC) and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (UOC-MP) to prepare for a special unification council. The Russian Orthodox Church in Ukraine will equally coexist with all other churches and religious organizations as guaranteed by the Constitution and law.

Kyiv Patriarchate urges Ukraine’s church heads to get ready for special unification council | Censor.NET

12.10.18 15:55 – Kyiv Patriarchate urges Ukraine’s church heads to get ready for special unification council Head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate (UOC-KP) Filaret has urged the hierarchs of the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church (UAOC) and the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (UOC-MP) to prepare for a… View news.

Filaret says Russian Orthodox church may equally exist, but it won’t be called ‘Ukrainian church’ | KyivPost

Head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Kyiv Patriarchate Filaret notes that other Orthodox churches have the right to exist in Ukraine, but only those who will be part of a single local church will be called the “Ukrainian Church.” “Establishment of a single local Orthodox church in Ukraine does not mean that there can be no other churches on our Ukrainian territory, meaning the Russian Church,” he said at a briefing in Kyiv on Oct. 11. Patriarch Filaret explained that those Ukrainian dioceses that do not join the united Ukrainian Orthodox Church “will not have the right to be called the “Ukrainian Church.” “And they will have the right to exist, along with equal rights with the Ukrainian church. But hey will be called the “Russian church,” not the “Ukrainian,” he stressed.

Russian empire losing one of last levers of influence on its former colony – Poroshenko on decision of Ecumenical Patriarchate | UNIAN

Tomos is actually another Act of Declaration of Independence of Ukraine, Ukrainian The empire is losing one of the last levers of influence on its former colony,” Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said in a statement regarding the decision of the Holy Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. “Today we received the Autocephaly, and after the Council, the Primate of the Ukrainian Local Orthodox Church will obtain Tomos,” said the president. “It was His (Lord’s) wish to have His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and the Holy Synod of the Mother Church of Constantinople declare the long-dreamed and long-awaited ‘yes’, for which we have long fought. There will be Autocephalous Orthodox Church of Ukraine,” he said. “The decision of the Ecumenical Patriarch and the Holy Synod has finally dispelled the imperial illusions and chauvinistic fantasies of Moscow, which were not supported by any legal church document – about Ukraine as so called ‘canonical territory of the Russian Church’.” Read more on UNIAN: https://www.unian.info/society/10296726-russian-empire-losing-one-of-last-levers-of-influence-on-its-former-colony-poroshenko-on-decision-of-ecumenical-patriarchate.html

Poroshenko urges Ukrainians to pray for autocephaly of Ukrainian church | UNIAN

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has called on Ukrainians to gather on Kyiv’s St. Sophia’s Square in the morning on October 14 to pray for the granting of autocephaly to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. The president supported the idea of respected public leaders to hold common prayer.

Ukraine’s split from Russian Orthodox Church puts a dent in Putin’s image – The Globe and Mail

Patriarch Bartholomew’s declaration of independence undermines Putin’s image as the leader of the world’s 300 million Orthodox Christians

Ukraine Wins Approval for Historic Split From Russian Church

Ukraine secured approval on Thursday to establish an independent church in what Kiev says is a vital step against Russian meddling in its affairs, but the Russian clergy fiercely opposes as the biggest split in Christianity for a thousand years. At a three-day synod presided over by the Ecumenical Patriarch in Istanbul, seat of the global spiritual leader of roughly 300 million Orthodox Christians, endorsed Ukraine’s request for an “autocephalous” (independent) church. The synod will “proceed to the granting of Autocephaly to the Church of Ukraine,” a statement said. The synod took several decisions to pave the way for Ukraine to set up its church, including rehabilitating a Ukrainian patriarch excommunicated by the Russian Orthodox Church for leading a breakaway church in the early 1990s.

Ukraine wins approval for historic split from Russian church | Reuters

Ukraine secured approval on Thursday to establish an independent church in what Kiev says is a vital step against Russian meddling in its affairs, but the Russian clergy fiercely opposes as the biggest split in Christianity for a thousand years.

Ukraine splits from Russian orthodox church

Growing tensions since Russia’s 2014 invasion of Ukraine on Thursday lead to a historic split of the world’s 300 million Orthodox Christians, as the Ecumenical Patriarch in Istanbul allowed Kiev to establish an independent church. Kiev sees it is a vital …

Ukrainian Orthodox Church Wins Independence From Moscow

Istanbul’s Patriarch Bartholomew I says he will recognize autonomy of Ukraine’s church, sparking celebrations in Kyiv and outrage in Moscow

Orthodox Patriarch commits to independent Ukrainian Church, snubs Moscow | CatholicHerald.co.uk

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew’s move will likely heighten tensions with the Russian Orthodox Church

Orthodox Church to move forward with Ukrainian independence

Ukraine’s president on Thursday hailed the announcement by Orthodoxy’s Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople that it will move forward with granting Ukrainian clerics independence from the Russian Orthodox Church.

Prayers Answered: Ukrainians Greet Church Split With Open Arms, Despite Moscow’s Warnings

Like its Moscow counterpart, the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Kyiv traces its history to Kievan Rus. But a lot has changed in the intervening centuries. Just ask these Ukrainian worshipers.

🇺🇦🇷🇺Ukraine’s Orthodox Church is now independent of Russia l Al Jazeera English – YouTube

Al Jazeera English Published on Oct 12, 2018 Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko has welcomed a decision that gives his country’s Christian Orthodox Church full independence from Russia. It follows the decision by the Ecumenical Patriarch in Istanbul – the spiritual leader of 300 million Orthodox believers worldwide. Al Jazeera’s Andrew Simmons reports from Kiev.

‘We Don’t Want Confrontation’: Ukraine’s Patriarch Filaret On Split With Russian Orthodox Church – YouTube

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Published on Oct 12, 2018 Patriarch Filaret, the head of the Kyiv Patriarchate, has welcomed a decision to recognize the independence of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. Originally published at – https://www.rferl.org/a/we-dont-want-…

Poroshenko Hails Independence Of Ukrainian Orthodox Church – YouTube

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Published on Oct 12, 2018 Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko hailed a decision to recognize the independence of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. Speaking to reporters on October 11, Poroshenko said the recognition was an issue of sovereignty and national security for Ukraine. Originally published at – https://www.rferl.org/a/poroshenko-ha

Sue Thy Neighbor: Ukrainian Village Divided Over Church – YouTube

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Published on Oct 12, 2018 The Patriarchate of Constantinople agreed on October 11 to recognize the independence of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, making waves in Moscow. In one Ukrainian village, a schism has already been playing out with a fight over the only local church. Originally published at –https://www.rferl.org/a/sue-thy-neigh

What do tensions among Orthodox believers mean for modern Christianity? – Angelus News – Multimedia Catholic News

In 2014, Russia prompted an international uproar when it annexed the Ukrainian territory of Crimea, while also backing a separatist movement in Eastern Ukraine, part of a war that has claimed…

 

 

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