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From Russia with Hate: Anti-Tributes to Senator John McCain


Anonymous expert compilation, analysis, and reporting.

I was and will remain a fan of Senator John McCain. He was a great American, a true hero, and was the consummate Statesman. He had his faults and failures, he readily admitted those.  His goal, however, was to make Arizona, the United States, and the world a better place. He dedicated his life, for over 40 years after retiring from the US Navy as a Captain, for us.

The venom, the hatred, the misunderstanding of who he was, what he actually did, and more importantly why, numbs my soul.  Much of it I blame on Russian propaganda and especially Russian trolls for spreading disinformation about John McCain – in order to divide us.  I cannot count how often his detractors have copied and pasted Russian troll posts to validate and support their arguments. It is truly sickening. 

Yet Russian denials continue and the trolls carry on unabated, seemingly without a soul. Russia must be held accountable for its continuing attacks.

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The WashPost summary is correct: “John McCain was a true friend of Russia — because he was so clear-sighted about its leaders.”


Russian media say they hope late Senator John McCain is burning in hell | Daily Mail Online

The popular pro-Kremlin tabloid Komsomolskaya Pravda accused McCain of lying about being tortured during his captivity in Vietnam and painted him is a warmonger who hated Russia. Rossiya 1 TV channel described McCain as the ‘chief symbol of Russophobia’ who could not stand Russia’s ‘independent foreign policy’ Tabloid Komsomolskaya Pravda accused the former POW of lying about enduring torture during Vietnam War. Russian politician Leonid Slutsk told the RIA Novosti state news agency that McCain was a ‘courageous and principled person’. Vladimir Putin issued no message of condolences on McCain’s passing of a brain tumor on Saturday.

Burning in hell: Moscow press sheds few tears for ‘chief Russophobe’ McCain | The Times of Israel

Pro-Kremlin media slams late US senator who ‘adored war’; Ukraine praises him, mulls naming a Kiev street in his honor

Burning in hell: Russian press sheds few tears for McCain

Russian pro-Kremlin media pulled no punches on Monday in condemning John McCain, who died of a brain tumour at the weekend, as Washington’s “chief Russophobe”. McCain, who died aged 81 on Saturday, irked Russia with his support for pro-Western leaders in ex-Soviet Georgia and Ukraine as

Russia Reacts To John McCain Death: ‘The Enemy Died,’ Says Politician, ‘Will Of Allah’ Chechen Leader Adds

Russian politicians and state media responded Sunday to the death of Senator John McCain, who was a longtime critic of Vladimir Putin’s regime, and the Russians didn’t have much nice to …

Russian politician on McCain: The enemy is dead – YouTube

CNN Published on Aug 27, 2018 After a Russian politician and Russian State TV reacted with unkind words following the news of Sen. John McCain’s death, CNN national security commentator Mike Rogers said McCain would take those words as a badge of courage.

Russia state media refuses to honor John McCain: “He was an implacable opponent of Russia” | Salon.com

It seems as if every American has offered some words of John McCain. The “maverick” senator, who almost became the president of the United States, died on Saturday. Not everyone has been kind in their obituaries. Some progressives have chosen to remember McCain for his love of war and his opposition to universal health care. Perhaps the harshest tribute McCain has received was from the Russian government. Steve Rosenberg, BBC’s Moscow correspondent, reported that Russia state TV was not too complimentary of McCain. “He was an implacable opponent of Russia, who supported even tougher sanctions,” a Russian newscaster said.

Kremlin-backed state media attacks McCain following his death: ‘An implacable opponent of Russia’

It seems as if every American has offered some words of John McCain. The “maverick” senator, who almost became the president of the United States, died on Saturday. Not everyone has been kind in their obituaries. Some progressives have chosen to remember McCain for his love of war and his opposition to universal health care.

Tributes flow for John McCain but Russian media remembers a committed enemy who ‘adored war’ | South China Morning Post

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko issued a message of condolences, but none was forthcoming from Russian President Vladimir Putin

Pro-Kremlin Media Portray McCain as a Russia-Hater

Pro-Kremlin media outlets’ characterized Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) Sunday as a war-mongering Russia-hater, reacting to the death of a man who was a critic of Vladimir Putin before he first became president, and who called it an honor when Putin hit back with reciprocal sanctions in 2014.

Russian media slam McCain: Maverick Republican ‘not shy about throwing American troops in harm’s way’ | TheHill

Russian state TV called Sen.

Russia Needed an Opponent Like John McCain

Senator John McCain, who died on Saturday, is being eulogized not just in the U.S. but also throughout Eastern Europe, in Ukraine and in Georgia. The clarity of McCain’s stance on Russia will be missed by everyone, though, including Kremlin propagandists. Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki remembered

John McCain saw through Vladimir Putin better than anyone – The Washington Post

John McCain was a true friend of Russia — because he was so clear-sighted about its leaders.

Window on Eurasia — New Series: John McCain’s Most Important Lesson Gets Through to Russians if Not Yet to West: Russia and Putin Aren’t One and the Same Thing

Paul Goble Staunton, August 27 – The Kremlin and its supporters have acted in a predictable fashion following the death of US Senator John McCain. For these people, he was the last Cold Warrior and a dyed in the wool Russophobe, someone whose passing was “the death of an enemy” (themoscowtimes.com/news/enemy-is-dead-russia-reacts-us-senator-john-mccains-passing-62677). For them, the late American politician was a Russophobe because he criticized the authoritarian actions of the Putin regime at home and its aggression against Georgia and Ukraine since according to their lights Russia and Putin are one and the same and criticizing the Kremlin leader is the same a criticizing Russia. That of course has been the view the Putin regime has been promoting for years, but what is striking over the last several days is understanding of many Russians that McCain was, as he himself observed, “a better friend of Russia” than those in the Kremlin and that he believed the Russian people “deserved a better leader” than Vladimir Putin. In an impressive display that Putin has failed in his effort to convince Russians otherwise, commentator after commentator in Moscow has made the point in their articles about the passing of Senator McCain that Putin and Russia are not one and the same thing and that Russians deserve a better system than the one the Kremlin leader has imposed. Among numerous examples are the following: echo.msk.ru/blog/echomsk/2265954-echo/https://echo.msk.ru/blog/partofair/2266516-echo/ https://echo.msk.ru/blog/pozner/2266450-echo/ echo.msk.ru/blog/karamurza/2266378-echo/echo.msk.ru/blog/kasyanov_mihail/2266236-echo/ and republic.ru/posts/91921. Sadly, McCain’s lessons on this point have made less headway in the West where authoritarian leaders and their supporters are all to happy to join with the Putinists and view Putin and Russia as one and the same thing and to consider any criticism of the Kremlin leader as an attack on Russia deserving denunciation as Russophobia.

Brian Bonner: Who will fill John McCain’s void for Ukraine? | KyivPost

When Ukraine faced some of its darkest and most dangerous times, it was often not the voice of a Ukrainian politician who lifted the spirits of the nation. It was the voice of U.S. Sen. John McCain, who died from cancer on Aug. 25 at age 81 and who traveled several times to Ukraine. The Republican from Arizona conveyed his passion for the rightness of Ukraine’s cause in defeating its external enemy, Russia, and its internal enemy, corruption. And in so doing, he not only lifted the spirits of Ukrainians, he got under the skin of Russian dictator Vladimir Putin. I believe his last visit to Ukraine came on New Year’s Eve, Dec. 31, 2016, when he spent time with Ukrainian troops in Mariupol, 800 kilometers southeast of Kyiv. While most of the world was celebrating and not paying attention to him, McCain and other senators chose make the frigid trip to show solidarity with Ukraine’s fighting men and women. “Our message tonight is that in 2017, we will defeat the invaders and send them back to where they came from. And to Vladimir Putin, you will never defeat the Ukrainian people and deprive them of their independence and freedom,” McCain told the soldiers, thankfully preserved on YouTube. “I thank all of you for your service. I send the message from the American people. We are with you. Your fight is our fight. We will win together.” To wounded soldiers and their families, he said: “We will never, ever forget you.” Who is going to do that today? Not U.S. President Donald J. Trump. And who even did that then? No American politician was stronger on Ukraine and tougher on Russia than McCain. U.S. President Barack Obama, for all of his strengths, was weak on Russia and outsourced visiting Ukraine to his vice president, Joseph Biden. McCain gave an interview to the Kyiv Post on Dec. 15, 2013, amid the EuroMaidan Revolution that toppled Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych more than two months later. Re-reading the interview today, he was prescient on three issues, including Russia’s threat to Ukraine, the power of Ukraine’s oligarchs and the unlikelihood that Ukraine will fight corruption quickly.

He got upset when I asked him not to go to Shyrokyne, – Poroshenko about McCain – 112.international

American senator John McCain took offense to Petro Poroshenko, the Ukrainian President, for the offer to postpone the visit to Shyrokyne due to the artillery attacks performed by the militants in December 2016. The Head of the State said it in Avdiivka on August 26, Svyatoslav Tseholko, the Spokesperson of the President, posted a video on Facebook. Poroshenko recalled the visit to Shyrokyne on December 31, 2016. According to him, John McCain postponed his visit to Georgia and said: “My place is here”.

Why Troops Named a Street in a Ukraine Town After John McCain

The Arizona Republican was a champion of people around the world fighting for their freedom. At the front-line village of Krymske in 2015, Ukrainian troops renamed a street that had honored a Soviet luminary, calling it “John McCain Street.” The troops taped a printed-out sheet of paper with the U.S. senator’s picture to a power pole to make it official. Apparently, “hero” translates to “John McCain” for anyone fighting for freedom. The Arizona Republican died Saturday from a brain tumor, four days short of his 82nd birthday. I’m sure that in the wake of McCain’s death, many buildings and streets across America will be renamed in his honor. For me, however, one of the most telling testaments to the quality of McCain’s life is that potholed, artillery-divoted street that bears his name in eastern Ukraine’s war zone. John McCain was a lot of things—father, husband, senator, presidential candidate, fighter pilot, prisoner of war. McCain also was a champion of people around the world fighting for their freedom. That includes the people of Ukraine, who’ve endured a revolution and war to achieve the liberty to chart their own future as a sovereign, democratic nation, free from Russian oppression. McCain was on Kyiv’s central square, the Maidan, in December 2013 to cheer on the brave protesters who would later overthrow the brutal, pro-Russian regime of Viktor Yanukovych. “We are here to support your just cause, the sovereign right of Ukraine to determine its own destiny freely and independently,” McCain told the Ukrainian protesters.

Former Vietnamese jailer says he respected John McCain, liked ‘his toughness’

Sen. John McCain’s Vietnamese jailer said he respected his former inmate and was saddened by his death, as others in Vietnam paid their respects to the former Navy aviator who became a prisoner of war and later was instrumental in bringing the countries together after the conflict. McCain’s A4-E Skyhawk attack jet was shot down over Hanoi in 1967. He was held in the infamous “Hanoi Hilton” prison for more than five years. Former Col. Tran Trong Duyet, who ran the prison at the time, said he met with McCain many times while he was confined there. “At that time I liked him personally for his toughness and strong stance,” he told the newspaper Vietnam News, published by the official Vietnam News Agency. “Later on when he became a U.S. senator, he and Sen. John Kerry greatly contributed to promote Vietnam-U.S. relations so I was very fond of him,” Vietnam News quoted Duyet as saying Sunday. “When I learnt about his death early this morning, I feel very sad. I would like to send condolences to his family. I think it’s the same feeling for all Vietnamese people as he has greatly contributed to the development of Vietnam-U.S. relations,” Duyet was quoted as saying.

John McCain’s former Vietnamese jailer says he respected late senator – Chicago Tribune

Former Col. Tran Trong Duyet, who ran the prison at the time, said he met with McCain many times while he was confined there.

 

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