Information operations · Information Warfare · Russia

Another Former Russian Intelligence Officer Poisoned in the UK (9)


Anonymous expert compilation, analysis, and reporting.

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PM May delivered her statement to the House. The measures are very reasonable, but do not go as far as advocated by some, such as US Sen Menendez, who has called for Russia to be designated a state sponsor of terrorism. The cost to Russia does clearly exceed any propaganda gains they may have gleaned from the attack, reflecting the previously observed pattern in the actions of the Putin regime that has repeatedly made expensive and often unsustainable sacrifices in expensive assets to produce short term propaganda effects. The mass media are largely focussed on the most visible expulsion of diplomatic staff.

Cited from the statement by PM May in the House:

“As the discussion in this House on Monday made clear, it is essential that we now come together – with our allies – to defend our security, to stand up for our values and to send a clear message to those who would seek to undermine them.

This morning I chaired a further meeting of the National Security Council, where we agreed…

…immediate actions to dismantle the Russian espionage network in the UK…

…urgent work to develop new powers to tackle all forms of hostile state activity and to ensure that those seeking to carry out such activity cannot enter the UK…

…and additional steps to suspend all planned high-level contacts between the United Kingdom and the Russian Federation.

Let me start with the immediate actions.

Mr Speaker, the House will recall that following the murder of Mr Litvinenko, the UK expelled four diplomats.

Under the Vienna Convention, the United Kingdom will now expel 23 Russian diplomats who have been identified as undeclared intelligence officers.

They have just one week to leave.

This will be the single biggest expulsion for over thirty years and it reflects the fact that this is not the first time that the Russian State has acted against our country.

Through these expulsions we will fundamentally degrade Russian intelligence capability in the UK for years to come. And if they seek to rebuild it, we will prevent them from doing so.

Second, we will urgently develop proposals for new legislative powers to harden our defences against all forms of Hostile State Activity.

This will include the addition of a targeted power to detain those suspected of Hostile State Activity at the UK border. This power is currently only permitted in relation to those suspected of terrorism.

And I have asked the Home Secretary to consider whether there is a need for new counter-espionage powers to clamp down on the full spectrum of hostile activities of foreign agents in our country.

Mr Speaker, as I set out on Monday we will also table a Government amendment to the Sanctions Bill to strengthen our powers to impose sanctions in response to the violation of human rights.

In doing so, we will play our part in an international effort to punish those responsible for the sorts of abuses suffered by Sergey Magnitsky.

And I hope – as with all the measures I am setting out today – that this will command cross-party support.

Mr Speaker, we will also make full use of existing powers to enhance our efforts to monitor and track the intentions of those travelling to the UK who could be engaged in activity that threatens the security of the UK and of our allies.

So we will increase checks on private flights, customs and freight.

We will freeze Russian State assets wherever we have the evidence that they may be used to threaten the life or property of UK nationals or residents.

And led by the National Crime Agency, we will continue to bring all the capabilities of UK law enforcement to bear against serious criminals and corrupt elites. There is no place for these people – or their money – in our country.

Mr Speaker, let me be clear.

While our response must be robust it must also remain true to our values – as a liberal democracy that believes in the rule of law.

Many Russians have made this country their home, abide by our laws and make an important contribution to our country which we must continue to welcome.

But to those who seek to do us harm, my message is simple: you are not welcome here.

Mr Speaker, let me turn to our bi-lateral relationship.

As I said on Monday, we have had a very simple approach to Russia: Engage but beware.

And I continue to believe it is not in our national interest to break off all dialogue between the United Kingdom and the Russian Federation.

But in the aftermath of this appalling act against our country, this relationship cannot be the same.

So we will suspend all planned high level bi-lateral contacts between the United Kingdom and the Russian Federation.

This includes revoking the invitation to Foreign Minister Lavrov to pay a reciprocal visit to the United Kingdom…

…and confirming there will be no attendance by Ministers – or indeed Members of the Royal Family – at this Summer’s World Cup in Russia.

Finally, Mr Speaker, we will deploy a range of tools from across the full breadth of our National Security apparatus in order to counter the threats of Hostile State Activity.

While I have set out some of those measures today, Members on all sides will understand that there are some that cannot be shared publicly for reasons of National Security.

And, of course, there are other measures we stand ready to deploy at any time, should we face further Russian provocation.

Mr Speaker, none of the actions we take are intended to damage legitimate activity or prevent contacts between our populations.

We have no disagreement with the people of Russia who have been responsible for so many great achievements throughout their history.

Many of us looked at a post-Soviet Russia with hope. We wanted a better relationship and it is tragic that President Putin has chosen to act in this way.

But we will not tolerate the threat to life of British people and others on British soil from the Russian Government. Nor will we tolerate such a flagrant breach of Russia’s international obligations.

Mr Speaker, as I set out on Monday, the United Kingdom does not stand alone in confronting Russian aggression.

In the last twenty-four hours I have spoken to President Trump, Chancellor Merkel and President Macron.

We have agreed to co-operate closely in responding to this barbaric act and to co-ordinate our efforts to stand up for the rules based international order which Russia seeks to undermine.

I will also speak to other allies and partners in the coming days.

And I welcome the strong expressions of support from NATO and from partners across the European Union and beyond.

Later today in New York, the UN Security Council will hold open consultations where we will be pushing for a robust international response.

We have also notified the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons about Russia’s use of this nerve agent. And we are working with the police to enable the OPCW to independently verify our analysis.

Mr Speaker, this was not just an act of attempted murder in Salisbury – nor just an act against UK.

It is an affront to the prohibition on the use of chemical weapons.

And it is an affront to the rules based system on which we and our international partners depend.

We will work with our allies and partners to confront such actions wherever they threaten our security, at home and abroad.

And I commend this Statement to the House.”

Curiously UK Opposition Leader Corbyn is not accepting HM Govt’s position on the matter.

It will be interesting to see whether the UK is able to convince other NATO / EU nations to follow their lead.


Vladimir Putin was confronted by a British journalist over the poisoning of a former spy — and his reply was brutal | Business Insider

Steve Rosenberg, a BBC journalist, asked Vladimir Putin about the poisoning of the former spy Sergei Skripal.  The Russian president said, “Get to the bottom of things there first, then we’ll talk about this.”
Don’t try to intimidate us, Russia warns Britain | News | The Times

Russia warned Britain not to issue threats and “groundless ultimatums” as it defied a demand to account by midnight for the use of its nerve agent in the Salisbury poisoning.Theresa May is expected today to tell MPs of plans to retaliate for the assassination attempt on a Russian double agent and hi

Russia issues chilling warning that Britain ‘should not threaten a nuclear power’ after Theresa May accused Moscow of spy poison attack

IT comes after Theresa May accused Moscow of spy poison attack. But Moscow claims the British government had refused to provide materials used in the incident so the Kremlin could test them as he brushes off the Prime Minister’s accusations

Russia issues warning to Britain not to threaten a nuclear power | Daily Mail Online

As Theresa May prepared to unveil retaliatory measures against Moscow, the Kremlin refused to explain how its former spy Sergei Skripal was poisoned with a military-grade nerve agent.

Russia calls poisoning accusations by Britain ‘nonsense’ – The Washington Post

Russia on Tuesday dismissed accusations of any involvement in the poisoning of an ex-spy and his daughter as “nonsense,” saying it will only cooperate with a British investigation if it receives samples of the nerve agent believed to have been used.

Russian Embassy Says It Will ‘Not Respond’ To UK’s Midnight Deadline Over Salisbury Nerve Agent Attack

Moscow demands to see samples.

Russian Embassy mocks probe with tweets about mysterious helicopter, Tom Clancy – The Washington Post

The Russian Embassy tweeted pictures of what it called an “American helicopter” shining a searchlight on its buildings.

Why Moscow Will Never Apologize for Attack on Ex-Spy – The New York Times

In Russia, the poisoning of an ex-spy in Britain only adds to President Vladimir V. Putin’s image as a fearless defender of the nation — just before an election.

Cotton: Russia will ‘lie and deny’ about British spy poisoning | TheHill

Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton (R) said Tuesday that he expects Russian officials to “lie and deny” about the poisoning of an ex-Russian spy on British soil.

Russia analysis: trail from puzzling Skripal attack still leads to the very top | News | The Times

If the Kremlin decided to attack a little-known “traitor” on British soil, why did it choose this delicate moment, days before an election and a few months short of staging the World Cup? That question is puzzling experts as they consider the attack on Sergei Skripal, 66, and his daughter, Yulia, 33

Yury Felshtinsky | Play without rules | Fifth column | Articles | Каспаров.Ru

Yury Felshtinsky: Putin has rewritten the rules of traditional spy games. update: 12-03-2018 (17:34)Condemned in Russia for the state treasury officer GRU Sergei Skripal, may have been poisoned by a neurological paralytic poison in the English town of Salisbury. American historian Yuri Felshtinsky explained what this new round of atrocities of Russian special services could meanThe exchange of Colonel Sergei Skripal in 2010 for a dozen Russian “sleepers” arrested in the US was not typical, since never before had the Soviet government, like the Russian government, exchanged Russian (Soviet) spy citizens for its spies, caught abroad. Foreign spies were exchanged, and Russian (Soviet), for their own citizens, accused of espionage – no. Apparently, in 2010 the Kremlin had no choice-it was too much to get back to Russia the top ten, led by the famous Anna Chapman, back to Russia. Probably, from the first day of his life in the UK, Skripal remained in a serious risk zone, without even realizing it, since exchanged spies, of course, have never touched a finger before the present case. Imagine, what would the American or British intelligence services look like if they had killed by poison in Moscow the previously exchanged Anna Chapman and all the other members of the dozens, striking at the same time other people?The poisoning of former secret service officers, as well as the poisoning of opponents of the current Russian regime in Russia and abroad, has hitherto been the most frequent way to eliminate enemies. Poison (if you compare it with a gun) always weighs up the investigation. First you need to establish that the victim was poisoned. Then try to determine what kind of poison and who did it. It’s quite difficult to prove anything here. In the case of Alexander Litvinenko, for example, poisoned on November 1, 2006, it took several years. And even after all the charges were proven in the English court and brought to the Kremlin, they still refused to accept responsibility for the murder. In the case of Skripal, we will face similar difficulties at all stages of the investigation, and Putin and his entourage will laugh at us and mock us all, especially since he once paraphrased a famous phrase from the Soviet film of Stalin’s times about Alexander Nevsky: “Who With the sword he will come to us, and by the sword he will perish. ” Putin said: “Those who drip some poison, they themselves and swallow in the end, themselves poison and poisoned.”Even more tragic, that earlier, under strange circumstances, all the other members of the Skripal family died: his wife in 2012, his son in 2017. Only the daughter was left, poisoned now with her father. We still do not fully understand exactly what kind of poison was poisoned by Skrypal. Also we do not understand until the end, as initially in the case of Litvinenko, he will survive or not. Litvinenko was poisoned on November 1, 2006, and died on the 23rd. We do not know much yet, but the analogy with the case of Alexander Litvinenko is obvious.In addition, this is not the first such poisoning abroad in Russia. Of the proven cases abroad, this is the murder of Litvinenko (2006) and businessman Alexander Perepelichny (2012). Of the obvious cases in Russia is the death of Yuri Shchekochikhin (2003) and Roman Tsepov (2004). So poison is a favorite kind of armament of Russian special services. The list of people who died in London under doubtful circumstances is also serious. It includes, among other things, English citizens. It should not be forgotten that two well-known businessmen, including Litvinenko, namely Badri Patarkatsishvili and Boris Berezovsky, also died in dubious circumstances. Badri died in 2008 from a heart attack, being, in general, a young man, and Berezovsky was found hanged in 2013 in the house of his ex-wife. Unfortunately, after Litvinenko’s death, the only conclusion the Russian government made is that punishment will not be punished for the crimes committed. The Russian government no longer worries public opinion in the West. After all these deaths; after the invasion of Georgia in 2008, after the annexation of the Crimea and the invasion of Ukraine in 2014; after intervention in the election of a number of European states and in the US elections in 2016; after the last foreign policy speech of Putin, where he brazenly and blackmailing the whole world with atomic war, the Kremlin regards the opinion of the entire surrounding world as completely disregard.Yury Felshtinsky: Putin has rewritten the rules of traditional spy games update: 12-03-2018 (17:34)Condemned in Russia for the state treasury officer GRU Sergei Skripal, may have been poisoned by a neurological paralytic poison in the English town of Salisbury. American historian Yuri Felshtinsky explained what this new round of atrocities of Russian special services could meanThe exchange of Colonel Sergei Skripal in 2010 for a dozen Russian “sleepers” arrested in the US was not typical, since never before had the Soviet government, like the Russian government, exchanged Russian (Soviet) spy citizens for its spies, caught abroad. Foreign spies were exchanged, and Russian (Soviet), for their own citizens, accused of espionage – no. Apparently, in 2010 the Kremlin had no choice-it was too much to get back to Russia the top ten, led by the famous Anna Chapman, back to Russia. Probably, from the first day of his life in the UK, Skripal remained in a serious risk zone, without even realizing it, since exchanged spies, of course, have never touched a finger before the present case. Imagine, what would the American or British intelligence services look like if they had killed by poison in Moscow the previously exchanged Anna Chapman and all the other members of the dozens, striking at the same time other people?The poisoning of former secret service officers, as well as the poisoning of opponents of the current Russian regime in Russia and abroad, has hitherto been the most frequent way to eliminate enemies. Poison (if you compare it with a gun) always weighs up the investigation. First you need to establish that the victim was poisoned. Then try to determine what kind of poison and who did it. It’s quite difficult to prove anything here. In the case of Alexander Litvinenko, for example, poisoned on November 1, 2006, it took several years. And even after all the charges were proven in the English court and brought to the Kremlin, they still refused to accept responsibility for the murder. In the case of Skripal, we will face similar difficulties at all stages of the investigation, and Putin and his entourage will laugh at us and mock us all, especially since he once paraphrased a famous phrase from the Soviet film of Stalin’s times about Alexander Nevsky: “Who With the sword he will come to us, and by the sword he will perish. ” Putin said: “Those who drip some poison, they themselves and swallow in the end, themselves poison and poisoned.”Even more tragic, that earlier, under strange circumstances, all the other members of the Skripal family died: his wife in 2012, his son in 2017. Only the daughter was left, poisoned now with her father. We still do not fully understand exactly what kind of poison was poisoned by Skrypal. Also we do not understand until the end, as initially in the case of Litvinenko, he will survive or not. Litvinenko was poisoned on November 1, 2006, and died on the 23rd. We do not know much yet, but the analogy with the case of Alexander Litvinenko is obvious.In addition, this is not the first such poisoning abroad in Russia. Of the proven cases abroad, this is the murder of Litvinenko (2006) and businessman Alexander Perepelichny (2012). Of the obvious cases in Russia is the death of Yuri Shchekochikhin (2003) and Roman Tsepov (2004). So poison is a favorite kind of armament of Russian special services. The list of people who died in London under doubtful circumstances is also serious. It includes, among other things, English citizens. It should not be forgotten that two well-known businessmen, including Litvinenko, namely Badri Patarkatsishvili and Boris Berezovsky, also died in dubious circumstances. Badri died in 2008 from a heart attack, being, in general, a young man, and Berezovsky was found hanged in 2013 in the house of his ex-wife. Unfortunately, after Litvinenko’s death, the only conclusion the Russian government made is that punishment will not be punished for the crimes committed. The Russian government no longer worries public opinion in the West. After all these deaths; after the invasion of Georgia in 2008, after the annexation of the Crimea and the invasion of Ukraine in 2014; after intervention in the election of a number of European states and in the US elections in 2016; after the last foreign policy speech of Putin, where he brazenly and blackmailing the whole world with atomic war, the Kremlin regards the opinion of the entire surrounding world as completely disregard.

The Morning Vertical, March 14, 2018

In a piece featured below, political commentator Yury Felshtinsky argues that the poisoning of former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal in the U.K. illustrates that Vladimir Putin sees no rules in his confrontation with the West. According to Felshtinsky, the Kremlin has learned the lessons of the 2006 assassination of Aleksandr Litvinenko, noting that “the only conclusion which the Russian government drew is that punishment will not follow such crimes.” Felshtinsky is correct. But the poisoning of Skripal also illustrates something else. It is a stark reminder that the confrontation between Russia and the West is, at its heart, a battle of governance. It is a struggle between a world where things like political assassinations, extrajudicial state-sponsored harassment of regime opponents, and arbitrary application of criminal justice are acceptable — and a world where such things are beyond the pale. In the heady optimism that followed the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the assumption was that as Russia integrated with the West, it would adopt Western norms and values, like the rule of law. A quarter of a century on, what we are instead witnessing is the Kremlin exporting its norms to the West.

Jeremy Corbyn does not believe there is enough proof to blame Russia for the Sergei Skripal poisoning | Business Insider

Jeremy Corbyn is not yet prepared to blame Russia for the Sergei Skripal poisoning. The Labour leader believes British intelligence officials could be wrong, according to his spokesperson. Corbyn believes the attack could have been carried out by another eastern European state or the mafia. Theresa May said she was “surprised and shocked” by the comments.

Theresa May’s hardline statement in full revealing retaliation against Russia over nerve agent attack – Mirror Online

This is the Prime Minister’s full statement to the House of Commons cutting ties with Moscow and branding the attack on Sergei Skripal an “unlawful use of force by the Russian state”

Britain EXPELS 23 Russian diplomats over nerve agent attack plunging into worst battle with Moscow since Cold War – Mirror Online

The Prime Minister condemned the nerve agent poisoning of ex-spy Sergei Skripal in a damning statement accusing Russia of running a secret chemical weapons programme and breaking international law

UK expels 23 Russian diplomats after spy poisoning

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May has announced a series of measures to punish Russia following a nerve agent attack on a former Russian spy and his daughter in Salisbury in early March.

Britain expels 23 Russian diplomats over chemical attack on ex-spy

Britain will expel 23 Russian diplomats in response to a nerve toxin attack on a Russian former double agent in southern England, Prime Minister Theresa May said on Wednesday, adding it was the biggest single expulsion in over 30 years.

Britain Expels 23 Russian Diplomats Over Ex-Spy’s Poisoning – The New York Times

Prime Minister Theresa May said it was the biggest expulsion of diplomats in more than 30 years.

World awaits Britain’s Theresa May response to Russian spy poisoning – The Washington Post

Russia has denounced the British ultimatum and warned against any retaliatory moves.

Showdown Looms Over Poisoned Spy As Russia Fails To Respond To U.K. Deadline

British Prime Minister Theresa May is expected to announce measures against Russia on March 14, after Moscow ignored a midnight deadline to explain how a nerve agent developed during the Cold War was used to poison a former Russian spy in Britain.

Britain and Russia brace for showdown over nerve attack on ex-spy

Britain braced for a showdown with Russia on Wednesday after a midnight deadline set by Prime Minister Theresa May expired without an explanation from Moscow about how a Soviet-era nerve toxin was used to strike down a former Russian double agent.

Salisbury spy mystery: May and Britain’s credibility at stake after ultimatum to Russia

If Theresa May is incapable of punishing Russia, she will have shown Britain as weak and that could be dangerous in the long-term.

May is right: Russia is testing whether the west’s ties still bind | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian

The Salisbury poisoning is intended to find out how close Britain remains to the US, EU and Nato, says the Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff

Russia conflict could trigger ‘something we can’t control’ warns UK defence minister | Business Insider

Russian spy attack: May to set out reprisals in parliament | UK news | The Guardian

Moscow says UK is being ‘openly provocative’ and it will retaliate against any new measures

Russia spy poisoning: UK to announce reprisals – CNN

UK Prime Minister Theresa May will outline later how the UK plans to retaliate after Moscow ignored a deadline pver the Russian spy poisoning in Salisbury.

Russian spy poisoning: Britain’s Theresa May plans retaliation – NBC News

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May is set to retaliate against Moscow for its alleged role in the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury.

May Plots to Punish Russia as Crisis Over Poisoned Spy Deepens – Bloomberg

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May will set out how she aims to retaliate against Russia over the nerve agent attack on a former spy and his daughter, deepening tensions between Vladimir Putin’s regime and the West.

Britain and Russia brace for showdown as deadline expires for nerve attack explanation

Britain braced for a showdown with Russia on Wednesday after a midnight deadline set by Prime Minister Theresa May expired without an explanation from Moscow about how a Soviet-era nerve toxin was used to strike down a former Russian double agent.

Britain Gives Russia ‘Until Midnight’ To Explain Use Of Nerve Gas : The Two-Way : NPR

Britain is preparing to take “commensurate but robust” action after it concluded that Russia is behind the use of a deadly nerve agent on U.K. soil, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson says.

Sergei Skripal’s poisoning is Theresa May’s Falklands moment – but she will not rise from the ashes as Thatcher did | The Independent

Not only are those beastly Europeans ganging up on us in Brussels. Now we’ve got the wicked Russians threatening life and limb in our tranquil cathedral cities. We are under attack from all sides, and only she can protect us. Tick tock goes the countdown clock, and the tension mounts with every passing moment.  When Big Ben chimes midnight, will the Russian ambassador have yielded to the awesome might of Theresa May, and coughed on his president’s behalf to the nerve agent attack in Salisbury? At the time of writing, some 12 hours before it expires, the hunch is that this ultimatum will be treated like the one given to the German ambassador in 1939.

UK’s effort to rally allies over Sergei Skripal poisoning may fall short | Patrick Wintour | UK news | The Guardian

Lack of EU consensus would make it difficult to sanction Russia over poisoning of ex-spy

Britain’s May Gets EU Support, Cautious Backing From Trump, in Showdown With Russia | Top News | US News

US News is a recognized leader in college, grad school, hospital, mutual fund, and car rankings. Track elected officials, research health conditions, and find news you can use in politics, business, health, and education.

UK can stand up to Russia, but it will need its allies’ help – CNN

As the clock ticks down to the UK’s midnight deadline for Russia to come clean on its possession of advanced nerve agents, the government of British Prime Minister Theresa May is weighing an array of retaliatory options.

Russia is a rogue state. Will Theresa May do what Trump hasn’t? – CNN

Peter Bergen writes that President Trump has utterly failed to confront Vladimir Putin over Russian interference while Britain’s Theresa May has an opportunity to respond to the ex-spy’s poisoning with firm action

Trump says will talk to UK’s May, will condemn Russia ‘if we agree’

U.S. President Donald Trump said the United States still needed to sort out the facts behind the nerve agent attack in Salisbury, England, that struck down a former spy, and would talk to British Prime Minister Theresa May later on Tuesday.

Trump Backs U.K. In Clash With Russia Over Ex-Spy Poisoning | HuffPost

The two leaders agreed on the need for Russia to “face consequences.”

President Trump Finally Said Russia Was Probably Behind The Poisoning Of A Former Spy In The UK

Speaking outside the White House after sacking his secretary of state, Trump said, “It sounds to me like it would be Russia based on all of the evidence they have.”

Bob Menendez calls on Trump to designate Russia as a state sponsor of terrorism

Russia should face sanctions for violating a chemical weapons ban and a designation as a state sponsor of terrorism following the poisoning of a former spy, according to a top Senate Democrat. Russia should face sanctions for violating a chemical weapons ban and a designation as a state sponsor of terrorism following the poisoning of a former spy, according to a top Senate Democrat. “[T]he Trump administration designated North Korea a State Sponsor of Terrorism following the poisoning of Kim Jong Un’s relative in Thailand,” New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez, the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, said Tuesday. “The administration should also consider whether this designation should apply to Russia.” That move would place Russia on a short list of terror-backing states that now includes Iran, Syria, Sudan, and North Korea. British Prime Minister Theresa May accused Russia of using “a weapons-grade nerve agent” to poison a former military intelligence officer who had worked as a double agent on behalf of the United Kingdom. That puts Russia at risk of multiple forms of sanction and diplomatic retribution, according to the New Jersey Democrat. “Once again, I call on the Trump administration to recognize the danger the Russian government continues to pose to Americans and our friends around the world,” Menendez said. “The United States and the many allies of the United Kingdom must stand ready to support her in the aftermath of this brazen attack.” A state sponsor of terrorism designation would stiffen sanctions already imposed by Congress. U.S. officials have sought to punish Russia for the 2016 election interference, the invasion of Ukraine, and for partnering with Iran to support Syrian President Bashar Assad in a long-running civil war. Rex Tillerson endorsed May’s denunciation of Russia over the poisoning incident Monday evening, in one of his last official acts as secretary of state. But President Trump fired him unexpectedly Tuesday morning and hedged his position on May’s accusation. “It sounds to me like they believe it was Russia and I would certainly take that finding as fact,” Trump told reporters. “As soon as we get the facts straight, if we agree with them, we will condemn Russia or whoever it may be.” May accused Russia on Monday of attempting to murder former spy Sergei Skripal in an attack earlier this month.

Ukraine ready to aid spy poisoning probe in UK – Klimkin | UNIAN

It is already determined that a military-grade nerve agent produced in Russia was used in the attack in the English city of Salisbury.

Aust watching Russian nerve agent inquiry

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has flagged Australia may back further sanctions against Russia over a nerve agent attack in the United Kingdom.

Julie Bishop says Russia must explain attempted murder of Sergei Skripala

Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has hardened her language against Russia after speaking to British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson about the attempted assassination of double agent Sergei Skripal.

Anne Applebaum | Russians, nerve agents and everyone as a target – Chicago Tribune

Russians’ suspected use of a nerve agent catches London off guard.

First Skripal, Then NATO – WSJ

Security at home for Putin means showing that the West lacks the will to act.

Russian spy ‘poisoned by BMW after nerve agent smeared on door handle’ | Metro News

Investigators are focussing on Sergei Skripal’s BMW amid claims the nerve agent could have been smeared on its door handle. Police are looking into whether or not the former Russian…

Former spy Sergei Skripal was poisoned by Russian nerve agent smeared on his car door, report says | Business Insider

UK officials reportedly believe Sergei Skripal was poisoned via his car door. They told The Daily Mail that the deadly Novichok nerve agent was smeared Skripal’s car door. It could explain why both Skripal and his daughter Yulia were poisoned.

Nerve agent ‘smeared on car door’ of Russian spy Sergei Skripal | Daily Mail Online

The 66-year-old former double agent is believed to have been driving around in the red BMW around 1.45pm on the day he was found collapsed in the centre of Salisbury.

Police hunt for mystery couple ‘spotted near Russian spy Sergei Skripal moments before he collapsed’ as nerve agent probe broadens to second Dorset town

Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia, 33, were exposed to an ‘unknown substance’ while out in Salisbury last Sunday

Salisbury poison exposure leaves almost 40 needing treatment | News | The Times

Nearly 40 people have experienced symptoms related to the Salisbury nerve agent poisoning, it was revealed yesterday, as locals expressed anger about a lack of information from the authorities.Sergei Skripal, a former Russian double agent who sought refuge in Britain after a spy swap in 2010, and hi

U.K. Has Weapons to Use Against Russia, All With Drawbacks – The New York Times

As Britain weighs retaliation for the poisoning of a former spy with nerve agent, an array of financial and diplomatic tools are being proposed.

Russia threatens to ban British press if UK shuts down RT | TheHill

Russia on Tuesday threatened to kick British media outlets out of the country after the U.K.

UK could target Russia’s super rich after Moscow stays silent on spy poisoning

The Kremlin failed to give an explanation to the U.K. about how a nerve agent was used to attack a former Russian spy and his daughter in Salisbury, a move which could prompt a strong retaliation from the British government.

Theresa May’s full statement on Russian spy’s poisoning – CNN

UK Prime Minister Theresa May said Monday it was “highly likely” that Russia was responsible for poisoning an ex-spy. Read her full address to Parliament here.

Russia’s opposition hides in London, agents follow them, – The New York Times – 112.international

The poisoning of Sergey Skripal, a former Russian military intelligence officer and his daughter is the topical issue in the world. However, it is not a unique case and the representatives of Russia’s opposition who escaped from Kremlin to London are still on the hook as The New York Times reported. According to the former British intelligence officials, there are more intelligence agents of Russia in London today than it was in the times of the Cold War. They serve a variety of functions, including building contacts among the British politicians but their main task is to keep an eye on the hundreds of Russia who are aligned with Vladimir Putin, the President of Russia and those who stay against him.

Russian Emigres in Britain Given Police Detail

Wealthy Russian emigres in Britain have reportedly been given police protection following the high-profile poisoning of a former Russian spy that London blames on Moscow. British Prime Minister Theresa May said Russia was “highly likely” behind the March 4 poisoning of former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in the English city of Salisbury. She vowed to take “much more extensive measures” if the Kremlin failed to explain the origin of the highly potent nerve agent by the early hours of Wednesday.

Police Investigating Death Of Russian Businessman In London

A lawyer says a Russian businessman who associated with a prominent critic of the Kremlin has died in London.

Terror police investigate death of Litvinenko witness Nikolai Glushkov at home | News | The Times

Counterterrorism police were investigating last night the “unexplained death” in London of a Russian exile who was close friends with a critic of President Putin.The discovery of Nikolai Glushkov’s body was reported as the government opened an inquiry into alleged links between Russia and 14 other d

Russian exile Nikolai Glushkov found dead at his London home | UK news | The Guardian

Counter-terrorism unit investigates death of Berezovsky friend who claimed political asylum in UK after fraud conviction

Russian Exile With Ties to Boris Berezovsky Found Dead in U.K. – The Daily Beast

Nikolai Glushkov, who was close friends with the late Putin critic, was found dead at his London home.

Putin enemy found dead in London eight days after Skripal poisoning, as counter-terror police launch investigation

Counter-terrorism police have opened an investigation into the &ldquo;unexplained&rdquo; death on British soil of an arch enemy of Vladimir Putin, just eight days after the nerve gas assassination attempt on a Russian double agent.

Second Russian Exile Found Dead in U.K. Was in ‘Ill Health,’ Says Lawyer – WSJ

Nikolai Glushkov, a 69-year-old former top executive of Russian state airline Aeroflot and Kremlin critic who was found dead in his London home on Tuesday, had suffered from ill health, his lawyer said.

Spy Poisoning Is Foreign to the Lives of Most of London’s Russian Emigres – WSJ

The new middle class has little in common with the older waves of emigres, the wealthy oligarchs lured in part by a controversial investor program, or the likes of Sergei Skripal, the double agent now fighting for his life.

Mark Peplow | Nerve agent attack on spy used ‘Novichok’ poison | March 19, 2018 Issue – Vol. 96 Issue 12 | Chemical & Engineering News

Chemical weapons experts have identified the nerve agent used in the attempted murder of a former Russian double agent living in the U.K. It is part of a family of compounds known as Novichok agents that were developed in a Cold War-era weapons program in the former U.S.S.R. Russia now faces questions about its involvement in the attack, and indeed whether it has violated the Chemical Weapons Convention. The nerve agent was used against Sergei Skripal, previously a Russian military intelligence officer who was convicted of leaking secrets to the U.K. He was released in 2010 and settled in Salisbury, England, where he and his daughter Yulia were poisoned on March 4. “It is now clear that Mr. Skripal and his daughter were poisoned with a military-grade nerve agent of a type developed by Russia,” U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said on Monday, March 12, citing work by investigators at the U.K.’s Defence Science & Technology Laboratory at Porton Down. May said that it was “highly likely that Russia was responsible”, although Russia has denied any involvement in the attack. Novichok agents are organophosphorus compounds, similar to sarin and VX, which inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and cause a biochemical logjam that cripples the nervous system. Symptoms range from sweating and twitching to seizures and an inability to breathe. The U.K. has not disclosed the specific Novichok agent used against the Skripals.

Only Russia could be behind U.K. poison attack: toxin’s co-developer

A Russian chemist who helped develop the Soviet-era nerve agent used to poison a former Russian double agent in southern England said only the Russian government could have carried out the attack with such a deadly and advanced toxin.

Russian spy: This is how nerve agent Novichok destroys your mind and body even if you survive | The Independent

If Sergei and Yulia Skripal survive being poisoned by Novichok nerve agent, they may be left suffering illnesses that ruin their lives – which may be the point of the attack, security experts have warned.

Pick Your Poison: What the Nerve Attack in the U.K. Tells Us About Russia

Using nerve gas is a statement. What is it saying to spies, NATO, and the Russian people?

The Nerve Agent Too Deadly to Use. Until Someone Did. – The New York Times

Novichok, the poison used in England in an attack on a former Russian spy, is far deadlier than the generations of chemical weapons that came before it.

 

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