Information operations · Information Warfare · Propaganda · Venezuela

Venezuela’s Maduro: Helicopter attacked Supreme Court


In a video, Oscar Pérez, reportedly the pilot who flew the helicopter, reads a statement against the government. Photograph: @OscarPerezGV/Instagram/Reuters

This appears to be an attempt for a coup in Venezuela. 

Unfortunately the helicopter attack on the Supreme Court complex in Caracas was underwhelming and the masses did not join.  The pilot and his compadres have not been apprehended.

This is an indication of growing unrest, 

The reason I post is due to the huge reliance on social media to post pictures, videos, manifestos and most likely, propaganda. This report is full of social media reports, meaning a coup can advertise without the press.   It is actually more difficult to judge the size of the “movement” in this context, the number of people involved can easily be misconstrued. 

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Chaos

Venezuela is in the throes of a political and humanitarian crisis which has brought thousands of people onto the streets in mass protests demanding a change of government.

Soaring inflation and widespread shortages of medicines, food and other essentials have infuriated the local people, who are struggling to afford even basic necessities.

Under former president and Maduro’s mentor, Hugo Chavez, oil revenue fueled Venezuela’s economy. However, falling oil prices have made state subsidies unsustainable.

Anti-government protesters want Maduro to step down, accusing him of eroding democracy. Maduro, meanwhile, has sent the Venezuelan military onto the streets to maintain order, leading to deadly clashes.

Chaos

Venezuela is in the throes of a political and humanitarian crisis which has brought thousands of people onto the streets in mass protests demanding a change of government.

Soaring inflation and widespread shortages of medicines, food and other essentials have infuriated the local people, who are struggling to afford even basic necessities.

Under former president and Maduro’s mentor, Hugo Chavez, oil revenue fueled Venezuela’s economy. However, falling oil prices have made state subsidies unsustainable.

Anti-government protesters want Maduro to step down, accusing him of eroding democracy. Maduro, meanwhile, has sent the Venezuelan military onto the streets to maintain order, leading to deadly clashes.

Vivid social media images

Photographs posted online showed a helicopter with the initials of the investigative police unit on its side, flying above the capital, Caracas.

Through an open door an occupant is seen holding a banner saying “Article 350” — referring to an article in the Venezuelan constitution that allows citizens to oppose the government should it subvert democratic principles.

Video of the incident shared on social media shows the helicopter approaching the Supreme Court complex at speed.

Another video which was shared online shows the helicopter landing on top of a building as a few people below cheered. The helicopter then took off again, although it’s not clear where it went.

Online manifesto

In the video, Perez said members of his group were nationalists unaffiliated with any political party, and that their fight was not with the country’s security forces but rather against the “disastrous government, tyranny and the death of innocents.”

Earlier Tuesday, Maduro spoke at a rally and said, “I aspire that the world listens. After 90 days of violence, destruction and death. If Venezuela was launched into chaos and violence and the Bolivarian Revolution was destroyed, we would go to combat.

“We would never give up. And what couldn’t be done with votes, we would do it with weapons. We would liberate our fatherland with arms.”

Maduro said he had activated government security forces to investigate the attack.

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/27/americas/venezuela-supreme-court-helicopter-grenade-attack/index.html

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