Corruption · Russia · Ukraine

The Problem With English Used In Foreign Reporting


This is one helluva confusing report.  When I read through it the first time I thought it was interesting, but then a few of the words made me rethink the article. They didn’t quite fit, they didn’t work, they actually made me return and reread those suspect sentences to verify I was reading things correctly. 

I’ll say this was initially written in a language that was not English or the writer learned English later in life. Regardless, English does not appear to be their first language.

Anyhow, the story appears to throw a number of confusing points at the reader at once.  

First, a wee bit of history.  The source is Interfax.com.ua.  Interfax was a former Soviet news agency currently in Russia and Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Azerbaijan, the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, and China.  I will grant Interfax the benefit of the doubt and say the agency does its best to be fair, objective, and unbiased. I will, however, say that there are certainly some writers, editors, and senior editors that have a strong bias, perhaps even most employees, who do their best to remain professional.  This particular story, however, made me sit back and just go “hmmm”.  Think deep conspiratorial thoughts, that sort of thing. 

– Is this story an accusation against Interpol for not flagging these individuals, regardless where they were?  

– Then there is this little stool sample.

That means their entrance to the European Union or a number of other countries, namely Switzerland, Liechtenstein, the United States, etc., is now completely impossible. – Deputy Prosecutor General of Ukraine Yevhen Yenin

I’m confused.  Is Mr. Yenin telling us those countries may or may not be applying for status in the EU?  Is there now a disqualifying factor being held against them?  Do these countries now have some “levers of pressure” against them?  If sanctions against an individual is a disqualification for an entire country, I believe there are a whole bunch of countries who are hereby disqualified.    ..unless the writer made the point really unclear. 

Last but certainly not least, is the target audience people who live in the former Soviet Union?  Conspiracy theories work there, offering a completely different perspective on what appears normal in the rest of the world. Of course, there is a great conspiracy at work here. How else would all these corrupt former Ukrainian officials wind up in Russia and Interpol won’t touch them? 

But then again, perhaps the story just needs a good editing.  

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Most ex-officials, Interpol withdraws from wanted list, are in Russia – Yenin

 17:3006.05.2017

The overwhelming majority of former Ukrainian officials who served during the presidency of Viktor Yanukovych and whom Interpol refused to put on the international wanted list are in Russia, and thus there are no levers of pressure on them, Deputy Prosecutor General of Ukraine Yevhen Yenin has said.

“Some 90% of those whom Interpol refused to put on the wanted list are in Russia. Irrespective of Interpol’s decision, whether there is a red notice or not, Interpol determines for us that if these individuals are in Russia there are no levers of pressure on them,” Yenin said on the air of UMN (Ukrainian Media Network).

He also noted the sanctions imposed by the Council of the EU in relation to Viktor Yanukovych and his 15 companions are in effect.

“That means their entrance to the European Union or a number of other countries, namely Switzerland, Liechtenstein, the United States, etc., is now completely impossible,” the official said.

He said, according to the Prosecutor General Office’s estimates, about $40 billion was stolen during the presidency of Viktor Yanukovych.

“Over 2.5 years they stole about one national budget of Ukraine,” the deputy prosecutor said.

Source: http://en.interfax.com.ua/news/general/419999.html

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