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Russian TV Propagandists Caught Red-Handed: Same Guy, Three Different People (Spy, Bystander, Heroic Surgeon)

April 13, 2014
tags: ,

Andrei Petkov, Rossiya 1 program, ordinary citizen, innocent bystander

Pity Russian propagandists. They must stage scenes of massive and violent demonstrations in East and South Ukraine. They must patch together actual demonstration footage with images of exploding grenades, intermittent automatic weapon fire, wounded pro-Russian civilians, and menacing Ukrainian extremists, organized, paid for, and directed by sinister outside forces. They must show valiant local civilians opposing the Neo-Nazi and ultra-nationalist juggernaut from Kiev.

The Putin propaganda machine cannot rest. It must provide new footage daily for a viewing public eager for the next Ukrainian outrage, growing angrier with each passing day, and asking: When will our great leader, Vladimir Putin, go in and rescue our poor brethren across the border in Ukraine?

Interviews with innocent by-standers and ordinary citizens are a staple fare of the coverage. A woman shows the camera hundreds of spent cartridges she gathered after a night of violence. Extremists turn outraged local residents, on their way to visit wounded comrades, away from the hospital.  A babushka, in tears, bemoans the terror in which she lives and pleads for the Russians to restore order and civilization. Pretty good stuff. I’d believe it if I did not know better.

The Russian propagandists, trapped on a racing assembly line, are bound to cross wires on occasion. They will make mistakes, which they hope that viewers will not catch. But they have made a huge blunder, for which heads are falling in TV studios in Moscow and in Crimea: Three different channels have featured interviews with one Andrei Petkov, lying wounded in a hospital in the south Ukrainian city of Nikolayev. In the three interviews, he is identified by name. He is on his back in a hospital bed, describing his experiences in the previous evening’s violence, which left him with serious wounds. Petkov is dressed in a black outfit, his nose bandaged. In each interview, he speaks softly, but with earnest conviction. He cuts a sympathetic and credible figure.

The problem is that Andrei  Petkov is a different person in each interview! 

via Russian TV Propagandists Caught Red-Handed: Same Guy, Three Different People (Spy, Bystander, Heroic Surgeon).

 

More Russian Lies

April 13, 2014

This blog might make you giggle, apologies if you are reading at home with your family around.

Another Russian Disinformation Apparatchik

Another Russian Disinformation Apparatchik

Former Ukraine President Yanukovych is accusing the CIA Director of becoming personally involved in Ukrainian operations in East Ukraine.

President Yanukovych is directly blaming the US for any bloodshed in Ukraine.

Here is the entire short article.

Yanukovych accused the CIA and the U.S. for the war in Ukraine

Viktor Yanukovych accused the United States in the tragic events taking place in Ukraine.

“I want to say about the direct involvement of the recent events of the United States. U.S. bears its share of responsibility for the outbreak of civil war in the Ukraine, they grossly interfere in what is happening, indicate how and what to do, “- Yanukovych said, speaking at a press conference in Rostov-on-Don.

“Ukrainian security officials decided to raid in eastern Ukraine, after meeting with the director of the CIA. U.S. directly involved in the events in Ukraine, they acted through their diplomatic opportunities, and special services. “

“CIA Director Brennan actually authorized the use of weapons and provoked bloodshed in Ukraine.”

Just between us, the Director of the CIA refused to give intelligence to Ukraine, why would he ever authorize paramilitary operations in East Ukraine if no NATO troops have boots on the ground in Ukraine?

By the way, when Yanukovych says “Special Services”, he means Special Operations Forces (SOF) or Spetsnaz or some parts of the FSB.

Yanukovych has bought into the disinformation which passes for information coming out of Russia.  Another Russian disinformation apparatchik.

Kerry calls Lavrov to come up with solution of de-escalation of Ukraine’s crisis News Voice of …

April 13, 2014

Joel Harding:

This is a Voice of Russia piece which completely discounts any Russian culpability. WAY late in the article it finally brings up and dismisses any chance of Russian agents at work. The first half of the article places the blame on the Ukrainian government, stating any force used to displace pro-Russian occupiers of three towns in East Ukraine will nullify the work of the four powers talks. What a bunch of double speak and malarchy.

Originally posted on #UkraineStrong.org:

US Secretary of State John Kerry has called on his Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov , to take steps to de-escalate the crisis in Ukraine, a senior State …

http://bit.ly/1qtQ8e8

View original

A Guide to Russian Disinformation

April 13, 2014

Russian Disinformation

I do not pretend to understand everything the Russians mean when they issue a press release, a news report or an opinion piece, but here are a few key phrases and words I keep seeing that only sometimes make sense.  My gut feeling is that if they keep saying these phrases enough, eventually the reader will break down and just accept the words as…  not the truth but an acceptable word or phrase.

Kyiv the Junta.  The word Junta means a small group that rules a country after a Coup d‘ état.  The Russians use this as a pejorative, a negative term that also seems to carry the meaning of an illegitimate government, an illegal government.  Proof?  The government that rules has often been called illegal in russian media; until the May 25th elections it will be continually referred to as illegal.  So much for Russia trying to “stabilize” Ukraine.

a small group ruling a country, especially immediately after a coup d’état and before a legally constituted government has been instituted.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/junta

Traitor Maidan.  Those participating in the popular uprising in Kyiv, more specifically in the central square known as the Maidan, that resulted in Ukrainian President Yanukovych fleeing to Russia.  By linking the word traitor with an event that occurred in the Maidan, the purpose is to create a negative connotation for people revolting against an unpopular politician who was widely considered pro-Russian.  

A person who is not loyal to his or her own country, friends, etc. : a person who betrays a country or group of people by helping or supporting an enemy.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/traitor

Freedom fighters.  This term was originally used by those fighting for Ukrainian freedom has now been bastardized by pro-Russian propagandists to mean freedom from Ukrainian ‘oppression’ in East Ukraine.  

a person who is part of an organized group fighting against a cruel and unfair government or system

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/freedom%20fighter

Neo-Nazi Euromaidan regime.  Ukrainian government (junta) in power in Kyiv.  This phrase is pointedly designed to de-legitimize the government in Kyiv by associating them, fairly or unfairly with Right Sector, an ultranationalist movement run by Dmytro Yarosh.  Right Sector has a membership of approximately 10,000, so any real impact to the government is minimal.  The word regime is also has a negative connotation.  The Neo-Nazi phrase is another extreme negative but the truth is a symbol, reminiscent of the Nazi swastika, has been used by members of the far right, hence the overly broad use of this label on the current Ukrainian government. 

Foreign mercenaries snipers February 20, 2014 in Kiev. There are a number of different theories about the snipers in Maidan.  Some say Russian Special Forces.  Some say SBU, Ukrainian Special Security Service (Sluzhba Bezpeky Ukrayiny), trained by Russian FSB. Now the Russians are claiming the snipers were foreigners.  There is no proof as of present, but my gut feeling is they were Russians or Russian trained. 

Slovyansk and the CIA and MI6.  A current bit of real disinformation by Russian are the forces “disguised as the Ukrainian police” are purportedly CIA or MI6.  *cough* Perhaps they are Russian agents or Russian Special Forces or even out of work Ukrainians hired by Russia to pose as Ukrainian police.  Russian disinformation rules seem to apply: say it enough and your own people might believe it. 

Greystone Mercenaries.  Starting in Crimea, a popular Russian ruse is to say foreign mercenaries, more specifically Greystone, is present and at work in Ukraine. Greystone is a descendant of Blackwater, who became Xe, who became Academi, who now has a subsidiary named Greystone.  Put a balaclava on someone and call them Greystone.  Until they are unmasked and interrogated, there is no proof, hence a nasty source of fairly effective disinformation. The problem is Greystone is not going to deploy people to this sort of an area, not without the protection of some sort of US legitimacy.  Only someone without more than two brain cells is going to believe this after hearing it once.

Self Defense Forces.  This tiresome term is used for Russian Special Forces, Russian agents, out of work coal miners or Ukrainian citizens for hire by Russians or their agents.  The ‘provocateurs” are historically used by Russia to create unreal support for Russia and its causes.

Third Rome (Moscow).  The idea that Moscow is the successor to the legacy of Rome (First Rome) and the Holy Roman Empire (Second Rome).   There is little to no documentation and little and less meaning to this phrase. 

Third Carthage (London). An indistinct phrase used by Russian propagandists, most likely to make researchers like me waste their time.  Carthage was a powerful shipping port in modern-day Tunisia. It was destroyed and rebuilt in multiple Punic Wars.  Why it is supposed to mean London, today, is beyond me.  What’s more, I don’t care enough to look it up.  

Fourth Reich. Just as Nazi Germany was the Third Reich, this is a term for a supreme Fourth Reich, which supposedly means a reborn Germany.  Sometimes extended to mean the United States in a pejorative term.  A silly symblomatic term.

Gladio 2.  An invented term born out of NATO Operation Gladio, which put “stay behind” units in place in Europe.  This was an actual operation, which ceased functioning at the end of the Cold War.  Suddenly Operation Gladio 2 is springing up as a Russian disinformation term and every suspicious person in or near Ukraine without ties to a legitimate Ukrainian spy operation bears the moniker Gladio 2 operative.  Seeing as there is no such operation, it is difficult to disprove a negative.  Bottom line, a made up term with no basis in reality.

Russia vs. Ukraine: Crimea, All Over Again

April 12, 2014

Armed pro-Russian extremists guard a police station in the eastern Ukrainian city of Sloviansk after it was seized by a few dozen gunmen on April 12 © Kostyantyn Chernichkin

Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov lied.  “Sergei Lavrov: ‘It Is Not Russia Destabilizing Ukraine

In what looks like Russian Special Forces at work, masked men in what looks like Russian uniforms, carrying Russian equipment and using Russian tactics, moved to occupy Sloviansk in the Donetsk oblast, source here.  At least three roadblocks were set up and obstacles and defensive positions were erected.  

Everything appears in the same order and form as was Crimea.

May 11 referendum

Attempts were also made at Shakhtarsk, the the pro-Russian crowd was turned back. 

The gunman also said that protesters have the same demands as others in eastern Ukraine: a May 11 referendum that would let voters decided whether to join the Russian Federation or remain in Ukraine.

Please excuse the commentary in this video.

I need Help with Russian

April 11, 2014

I need somebody’s help.  A friend sent me a link to a BBC story, written in Russian.  I use my Chrome browser for translation.

I read the BBC story and it seemed a bit sensationalistic and referred to a Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) travel warning to Russian citizens traveling abroad.

So, naturally, I went to the Russian MFA website, which, big surprise, defaults to the English language.  So far, so good.

I began dropping in all the pertinent words from the article into the MFA search tool and zip, zero, nada, nothing found.

Then the friend, who I absolutely and totally trust, sent me a link to the same story as the BBC, on a Russia web site.

So my antennae began quivering.  I may have stumbled across something newsworthy but I may not disclose it, not yet.

My request is simple.  If you can read and write Russian fluently, please contact me.  I’ll send you the pertinent articles and I ask that you see if the Russian MFA document really exists.  That’s all.  Find the official travel warning.

I sent a request for authentication to a friend that actually works at the Russian Foreign Ministry but I don’t know if he’ll respond.

I have my best puppy dog face on right now. Please help?  Thanks!

Ukraine: Russian propaganda and three disaster scenarios – Yahoo News UK

April 11, 2014

Ukraine: Russian propaganda and three disaster scenarios

By Mykola Riabchuk | Al Jazeera – 12 hours ago

As the Ukrainian presidential election scheduled on May 25 gets closer, Kremlin’s window of opportunity for invading the country and derailing its European course is gradually narrowing. The rhetoric of Russian President Vladimir Putin justifying the Anschluss of Crimea and unscrupulous meddling in Ukraine’s internal affairs has been based on the premises that there is no legitimate government in Kiev, that it is being run by a gang of Nazis and anti-Semites who took power by coup d’etat and terrorised Russians and Russophones all over the country.

Such a claim, however calumnious and fully disproved on the ground by independent observers , opinion polls and the minorities themselves, can be sold nonetheless to some audiences, at least Russian, willing for various reasons to be fooled .

After May 25, when the presidential elections will happen, the propagandistic task would become much tougher. Neither Yulia Tymoshenko nor Petro Poroshenko – the frontrunners of the current presidential campaign – resemble anything close to the proverbial “nationalists”, “extremists” and “Russophobes”. In fact, both have actually been and remain primarily Russian-speaking in their life, even though, as most citizens of Ukraine, they have good command of Ukrainian as well.

via Ukraine: Russian propaganda and three disaster scenarios – Yahoo News UK.

 

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