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Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

  1. Driver in his 20s dies in a crash on the A46

    A man in his 20s has died in a crash on the A46 near Nailsworth.

    The driver, from Bristol, was pronounced dead at the scene and his next of kin have been informed, police said.

    His silver Hyundai Coupe is reported to have left the Bath Road in Barton End at about 3.15am.

    An investigation is under way and police remain at the scene.

    Roads nearby are expected to remain closed until later today.

    The roads that are closed are: A46 junction with B4058, Tiltups End, A46 junction with Hay Lane and Hazelcote Lane, Calcott Crossroads and the A4135 junction with A46.

  2. Zoos and safari parks set to reopen from Monday

    Giraffe in enclosure

    The prime minister is due to announce that zoos, safari parks and drive-in cinemas can reopen in England from Monday.

    Boris Johnson is expected to outline the latest step in the easing of the coronavirus lockdown at Wednesday's daily briefing.

    He will say the outdoor attractions can reopen as long as they follow social distancing rules.

    Some zoos, including Bristol Zoo, Chester Zoo and London Zoo, have reported financial struggles during the coronanvirus pandemic.

    Are you planning your first zoo trip since lockdown began? Email us and tell us your thoughts.

  3. 'No defence in law' but protesters won't be convicted, says barrister

    Colston statue thrown into harbour

    A barrister says he doesn't think a jury would convict those responsible for tearing down Colston's statue, despite there being grounds for prosecution.

    Matthew Scott from Bath has written a blog about the incident, in which he says that those responsible 'have no defence in law', citing criminal damage and damaging a listed building.

    The statue is classified as a Grade II Listed monument and Mr Scott wrote that the maximum penalty for the offence of damaging such an item is two years' imprisonment.

    He said that although the Crown Prosecution Service, local authority, English Heritage, or even an individual, could bring a prosecution, those responsible "will never be convicted".

    "As far as the listed building offence is concerned, people are rather overlooking that.

    "In normal circumstances, damage to part of our cultural heritage would be seen as something that would be prosecuted by the local authority itself.

    "It doesn't have to be the local authority, it could be the CPS," Mr Scott told BBC Radio Bristol.

  4. Author suggests Colston statue should be in 'park of fallen statues'

    Philippa Gregory

    Author Philippa Gregory has said she believes the statue of slave trader Edward Colston "should have been taken down long ago".

    Ms Gregory said: "I first came across him in 1968 when I won a scholarship funded by him, to attend a school founded by him: Colston’s School for Girls."

    The English historical novelist said while there she "learned the school’s tradition of founder's day - when the choir, me among them, sung ‘Let us Praise All Famous Men’, and the entire senior school wore his favourite flower - bronze chrysanthemums - in our buttonholes and threw them at his statue by way of thanks for our education and for the many Bristol facilities that he established."

    Ms Gregory, whose works include 'A Respectable Trade' - a novel set in 1787, about slaves who were trafficked and exploited in England - said she only learned of Colston's slave trading past at her last founder's day at the school.

    She suggests the statue which she describes as "not very good art" should have been taken down as "an important document of history".

    "I think it should be raised and be the first element in a sculpture park of fallen statues - like the memorial parks to the tyranny statues in the former Soviet Union," said Ms Gregory.

    "Bristol could lead the way in this - turning a statue to honour a slaver into a memorial for those who have suffered slavery. Turning a proud boast into a supine symbol. Slavery was a crime against humanity, no slaver's statue should be in any place of honour."

  5. Statue better placed in a museum say equality group

    Edward Colston statue

    A group which promotes equality and supports victims of hate crime said the Colston statue had "no place" being on show in the city centre.

    South west organisation Stand Against Racism and Inequality (SARI) has been tackling topics including racism and injustice for nearly 30 years.

    In a statement released in response to the statue being toppled in Bristol during the Black Lives Matter protest, SARI said it couldn't condone "criminal acts" but that the statue would be better placed in a museum.

    “We cannot condone criminal acts and we are aware that an investigation is ongoing into those responsible.

    "However, we join many others who say that the statue of a slaver who was as culpable as Edward Colston of causing the death and suffering of so many black Africans and profiteering so blatantly from the slave trade, does not have a place in the our city centre.

    "It would be better placed in a museum as a part of history to be learned from, for our future generations.”

  6. House detectives discover secrets of the past

    Peter and Sue Cullimore's house in Montpelier, Bristol

    A couple whose Georgian home just missed out on being filmed for the BBC programme A House Through Time turned detective themselves to discover its history.

    Peter and Sue Cullimore have lived in their house in the Montpelier area of Bristol for 30 years.

    Among the assortment of colourful characters who had lived in the house in Fairfield Road were a French aristocrat whose parents were guillotined in the Revolution; a Quaker philanthropist who twice married into slave-owning local families and the Phippen sisters, who ran early schools in Bristol for destitute girls.

    Mr Cullimore said: "House history detective work is time-consuming, quite addictive and can drive your family mad. But it’s the most fun I’ve ever had on a laptop!"

    The couple have written a book about their searches called 'Saints, Crooks and Slavers', which includes a step-by-step guide for readers on how to research past residents of their own home.

    Peter and Sue Cullimore's house alternative view
  7. SUBBED Statue better placed in a museum say equality group

    A group which promotes equality and supports victims of hate crime said the Colston statue had "no place" being on show in the city centre.

    South west organisation Stand Against Racism and Inequality (SARI) has been tackling topics including racism and injustice for nearly 30 years.

    In a statement released in response to the statue being toppled in Bristol during the Black Lives Matter protest, SARI said it couldn't condone "criminal acts" but that the statue would be better placed in a museum.

    “We cannot condone criminal acts and we are aware that an investigation is ongoing into those responsible.

    "However, we join many others who say that the statue of a slaver who was as culpable as Edward Colston of causing the death and suffering of so many black Africans and profiteering so blatantly from the slave trade, does not have a place in the our city centre.

    "It would be better placed in a museum as a part of history to be learned from, for our future generations.”

  8. Panellists for our live conversation tonight revealed

    Osob Elmi

    BBC News

    This evening, at 6.20pm, BBC West will be holding a conversation on Facebook about what happens next following the removal of Edward Colston's statue by protesters on Sunday 7 June.

    Part of the debate will also be shown on Points West on BBC One in the West from 18:30.

    Stacey Olika
    Image caption: Stacey Olika

    One of the panellists joining us is Stacey Olika and she will talk about “creating a better tomorrow.”

    “There have been thousands upon thousands of conversations especially with young black people in the city as to what we want Bristol to look like in the future," she said.

    “Right now the whole world is on Bristol for the first time in a long time and I think this is really a time where we can share the hopes we have for the future and why it was necessary for Edward Colston to come down and what that really means for us as creatives and for us working in the city and making a mark and making a real change.”

    Caine Lewis-Turner
    Image caption: Caine Lewis-Turner

    The second panellist is Caine Lewis-Turner who wants to discuss the way to make change.

    “My main objective is to reflect on what has happened this far and see where we can go from here and look at what the process will be to enact some kind of substantial change," he said.

    Yvonne Muringi,
    Image caption: Yvonne Muringi

    The third panellist joining us for the second time is Yvonne Muringi, one of the organisers of Sunday's Black Lives Matter protest in Bristol.

    She said: “I believe it’s super important that we keep the conversation going.

    “Sunday wasn’t the end of protesting, we may not be allowed outside the house but we can still find way to make change from home and believe speaking to the general public is one way”

    Visit this live stream or the BBC West Facebook page to watch the discussion at 6.20pm.

    It will also be available on BBC iPlayer.

  9. Bristol father pens verse reacting to racial injustice

    Video content

    Video caption: Somali poet pens verse inspired by the death of George Floyd

    Rashid Mohamed Elmi, 55, has been living in Bristol for more than 25 years and raised 14 children with his wife.

    Mr Elmi wrote a spoken word poem dedicated to the racial injustice, inequalities and police brutality inspired by the death of George Floyd.

    He said: “I did my best to keep my children socially aware, taught them who they are, where they come from, and their rights for when they were old enough to independently navigate through society.

    “In particular my sons, I taught them the truth and reality they would have to face from an early age and that we are a long fight away from just simply co-existing as a black person, an ethnic minority person and a Muslim person in the UK.

    “You would think that things would change in the 21st century but my children are living through what I lived through.”

    The spoken word poem is told in Mr Elmi's native Somali language and translated in English.

  10. Bristol City Poet invites 'Eddie' Colston to 'rust in shame'

    View more on twitter

    Vanessa Kisuule has performed a new work called 'Hollow' reflecting on the pulling down of Colston's statue by Black Lives Matter protesters on Sunday.

    Sharing the piece on Twitter, she writes that she has "never been prouder to be Bristol City Poet and to offer a poem to my adopted city than I am today."

    Among the 16,000 likes, the poem has been praised by author Philip Pullman.

    View more on twitter
  11. Protest placards to form part of new museum exhibit

    Placards held aloft during Sunday's Black Lives Matter march in Bristol have been collected and passed to one of the city's museums.

    Many protesters left their signs by the plinth where Edward Colston's statue was toppled.

    The M Shed has been handed them and says they will help form part of an exhibit about Bristol's history.

    View more on twitter